Care And Support

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    Adults with vulnerabilities in custody are not receiving appropriate support

    A report commissioned by the Home Office has said that lack of awareness and a shortage of trained volunteers means police often go ahead without on present, reports the BBC.Home Secretary Theresa May said the situation was "not acceptable".Appropriate adults are there to support young people or vulnerable adults when they are being interviewed by the police. This is to ensure effective...

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    Chief inspector warns cuts are affecting adult social care

    Andrea Sutcliffe has said that many carers ended up being "the sort of care worker you wouldn't want them to be", reports the BBC.Adult social care budgets have been cut by £4.6bn since 2010 - a 31% overall reduction - according to the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services.Ms Sutcliffe has said funding cuts has led to carers feeling overworked and undervalued. She said: "That...

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    Social care services for adults struggling due to budget cuts

    There is a £1.1.bn shortfall to councils in England warns the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services, and freezing care provider fees to save money is no longer sustainable, reports the BBC. The survey, which was completed by 147 directors of adult social services for councils in England, suggests that funding reductions to social care budgets have totalled £4.6bn since 2010 - a 31%...

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    People with vulnerabilities left at risk by policy makers

    ‘Solutions from the Frontline’, published by a coalition of charities looks into the ideas and experiences of service users. It investigates how the new government along with national and local policy makers can act to reduce stigma, improve services and support those who need it, reports 24dash.The Making Every Adult Matter (MEAM) coalition is calling for a new approach, where people...

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    Social landlords in Wales hope to save the NHS £1.7m

    The savings will come from housing 33 patients under the care of the Aneurin Bevan University health board, through a project called ‘In One Place.' This project places patients who have a mental illness or learning disability into specially designed homes provided by housing associations with rents paid by housing benefit, reports Inside Housing.Eight housing associations and five councils are...

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    New supported housing service for people needing care after hospital

    The service will provide supported accommodation for people who no longer need specialist medical care, but who are no longer able to return home due to changes in their home care needs. It is hoped that this will help reduce the strain placed on hospitals, reports 24dash. The supported accommodation is also accessible for people who require suitable accommodation to prevent unnecessary...

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    Proposal for an extension on the integration of health and social care in Staffordshire

    Staffordshire County Council wishes to agree on a new deal which will help to improve integration between health and social care for its residents, reports ITV.The deal, if agreed, will extend the partnership between the council and the Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent Partnership NHS Trust for a further three years initially.The original agreement was proposed in 2012 and saw the transfer of...

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    Older people and people with disabilities finding it hard to get state funded care

    Social services leaders are warning that many people with disabilities or older people with care needs are facing the challenge of having to pay for their own support at the end of the next parliament unless spending priorities are changed. The Association of Directors of Adult Social Services have said that Sustaining state-funded adult social care services in some parts of England could become...

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    The number of people using food banks has risen by 1,468%

    Latest figures by the Trussell Trust show that 913,138 adults and children have received three day's emergency food and support from its food banks over 103/14 which is an increase of 346,992 since last year, reports 24dash. Welfare reform minister Lord Freud claimed last year that the rapid expansion in food banks was being driven by people who wanted a free meal, and not by growing poverty and...

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    Support for patients with vulnerabilities with eased pressure on hospitals

    Teams of social workers and NHS staff will soon become available seven days a week under new care plans, reports the BBC.Ministers are predicting that pressures will ease on hospitals from April once the Better Care Fund comes into place. The fund has been created to close the divide between health and care systems which sees elderly people affected.Ministers believe the plans will help prevent...

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    How one housing association is communicating online with people who have hearing impairments

    Wheatley Group's SignVideo, a British Sign Language interpretation service, has been developed to help tenants with hearing impairments the opportunity to contact their landlord directly without having to ask a friend or family member.This will mean that if a tenant with hearing impairments needs to report a repair or other problem they can click the SignVideo link on the website which will take...

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    Digital makeover heading towards job centres

    Centres around the UK will see electronic pads that recognise job seekers' signatures using biometric software along with PC workstations and free wi-fi, reports the BBC.The computers will operate on the government's network and share the same level of security against hacking and viruses. The London Bridge Jobcentre has already tested this out,"We've moved away from customers coming in and...

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    Experts believe dementia patients face ‘care tax'

    The Alzheimer's Society have found that on average the equivalent of £32,242 a year was spent on care per patient, however researchers said that on average only a third of £10,784 came from NHS or council funds, leaving a shortfall, reports the BBC. The research has been carried out by the London School of Economics and Kings College London and was taken to update figures compiled by the...

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    Councils warn that lack of funds is threatening the Care Act

    The reforms are designed to put people and their carers in better control of their own care whilst limiting the amount that people will pay towards the support they need. However, a survey of 152 councils found that 134 local authorities are concerned about the cost of making crucial changes to services for people in need, reports 24dash. Councils say that uncertainty over the number of people...

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    Funding concerns raised over social care reforms

    A poll of 152 councils in England, were social care spending was capped for adults meaning they had to apply to councils for funding, found 134 had concerns over costs, reports the BBC.The government had said councils were receiving extra money to fund the change.Changes to the way social care will be provided is set to be introduced next year to help protect and support people who face large...

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    Campaigners want free end-of-life social care

    Macmillan Cancer Support says that the NHS in England could save £69m a year on the care of cancer patients alone. Analysis based on a review of patient surveys, official NHS spending data and interviews with senior decision-makers, reports the BBC. Whilst social care is currently means-tested ministers are considering providing it to everyone at the end of life. About half of people end up...

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    Complaints rise about Northern Ireland health and social care

    An annual report by the Northern Ireland ombudsman, Dr Tom Frawley has said that the complaints about health and social care were "increasingly profound", reports the BBC.The report found that most of the complaints received by the ombudsman regarding health and social care involved "serious adverse clinical incidents", or the "death of a loved one".Dr Frawley said: "The health and social care...

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    Tenants with vulnerabilities at risk over Care Act

    Research by Inside Housing has found that thousands of people with vulnerabilities are at risk of losing support under new care legislation that was passed last month. The Care Act requires councils to fund care for adults in ‘substantial' and ‘critical' care need from 2015, but not for those in ‘moderate' or ‘low' need. This has lead housing associations to warn that more strain would be...

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    Survey results of the abuse of autistic adults

    According to Community Care:"The charity wants the government to make it explicit in the eligibility section of the regulations that assistance can include support to prevent abuse or neglect, such as prompting or supervision to carry out tasks or checking whether an autistic person has been in a situation that could make them vulnerable to exploitation. It also says a safeguarding inquiry should...

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    Food bank usage up by 54% in 2013

    The demand for food banks and charitable help in the UK has increased by 54% in 2013 with twenty million meals provided.A report from Oxfam, Church Action on Poverty and the Trussell Trust has said that increased demand is coming from poor people in affluent areas including Cheltenham, Welwyn Garden City and the northern part of the Lake District. The Trussell Trust has said it was helping to...

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    Charities say care changes could see thousands of people losing out

    The new regulations set out the care needs someone must have to qualify for council-funded care. Charities say the criteria will lead to many people being shut out of the care system. However Care Minister Norman Lamb has said the new system will be fairer, reports the BBC. The changes will be introduced in April 2015 and will see all local authorities in England use the same minimum guidelines...

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    Health and social care fund ‘needs long-term clarity' says councils

    The Local Government Association called on ministers to commit to the fund until 2020 "to avoid the care system spiralling towards a deeper crisis", reports the BBC.The government has said it's made it clear to councils that the Better Care Fund is intended to last longer than one year. The scheme aims to cut hospital admissions in England and allow more home treatment. It is also designed to...

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    Wale's social care services receives major overhaul

    The Social Services and Well-Being (Wales) Act 2014 became law on the 1st of May and is the basis for an overhaul on the workings of adult and children's social care in the country.The changes include the creation of a National Adoption Service, portable assessments which will follow individuals if they move between local authorities and a National Outcomes Framework which sets out what children...

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    Support for tenants in sheltered housing on accommodation and tenancy due to new Wellbeing Service

    Weekly meetings are planned to be held throughout the district so that tenants of sheltered housing are able to raise any queries about their accommodation or tenancy through face-to-face opportunities.SKDC's Head of Housing and Neighbourhoods, Ian Richardson, said: "The meetings have been well attended so far and we are working closely with the new providers, the Lincs Independent Living...

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    New health and social care plan in Lancashire

    In the Lancashire Better Care Fund plan, it highlights how Lancashire County Council, NHS England, NHS clinical commission groups, district councils and other organisations will work together to provide better services to residents. In the plan it says how organisations can meet challenges currently affecting health and social care, which includes an aging population, widening health gaps between...

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    Experts call for merged NHS and social-care budget

    In the Barker Commission's interim report they say that with an ageing population and a rise in illnesses such as dementia, the lines between the two services have become ‘blurred'. Due to this, they believe friction is being caused between the NHS and councils over who is responsible for care. This then results in people facing delays getting care or going without, reports the BBC. The...

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    Social care services overhaul has been backed by AMs

    AMs have backed a bill that aims to simplify laws that regulate social care and make sure councils assess carers' needs, reports the BBC.Welsh ministers have said that the legislation was key to making social services "sustainable for generations to come". It is one of the largest and most complex pieces o legislation that has gone through the Senedd.Following the vote on Tuesday evening, Deputy...

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    Report finds that many adults with vulnerabilities are ‘imprisoned' in their care homes

    In the worst cases of the House of Lords investigation, safeguards were being used to oppress people and force decisions on them. They found that these measures, which are supposed to be used to look after at-risk patients, were actually being used to deprive them wrongly of their liberty, reports the Guardian. The House of Lords committee was set up to investigate how mental health reforms...

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    Research finds over nine million people borrow money for food

    The figure has come from a survey carried out for the Debt Advisory Centre in February and has revealed that 18.7% of respondents said they had to borrow money to buy groceries. The same survey last July found that only 6% of adults said the same, reports 24dash. The borrowing of money to pay for food was most common amongst younger people and the figure has climbed to 33.6% of 18-24 year olds...

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    Housing job cuts will hit people with vulnerabilities say union

    Jobs will be lost at South Essex Homes and Southend Council's ALMO due to its management fee being cut, which will result in job losses, reports Inside Housing. The ALMO runs 21 sheltered housing schemes and eight hostels, but now three of its homeless hostel manager positions are thought to be under threat.The council's remaining two care homes are also under threat due to the cuts.Claire...

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    The amount of food bank users rises by 400% in just two years

    The Trussell Trust has found that there were 12,839 visits to food banks in London in 2011-12 and in the first nine months of the financial year this had increased to 63,397 visits. The study also found that 65% of Londoners are concerned about the rising cost of food. 66% of Londoners also support the introduction of free healthy school meals for all primary school children, reports 24dash.The...

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    A remodelled sheltered housing scheme is set to expand

    Bield, a social care and housing provider has become the first landlord in Scotland to modernise all of its sheltered housing services and offer a new retirement service, reports 24dash.Bield believes its retirement housing provides accommodation and tenancy support as it is specially designed to be affordable, sustainable and personalised to each individual.The new service was first launched...

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    New Health and Work Service

    The Health and Work Service will cover England Wales and Scotland and offer non-compulsory medical assessments and treatment plans. It will be run by the private sector and be paid for by scrapping compensation to employers for statutory sick pay. Ministers have said that employers will save money overall as fewer staff will be off sick and that it may save companies up to £70m a year in reduced...

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    Food bank parcels for people who cannot heat their dinner

    "Kettle boxes" are now being issued by food banks for those who cannot afford to switch on their cooker to boil pasta or rice. These new boxes where developed by volunteers from the Trussell Trust charity and contain products which can be prepared just by adding boiling water. This includes instants soup, Pot Noodles, instant mash and just-add-water porridge, alongside staples such as crackers,...

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    Suicide prevention plan

    Choose Life, the previous strategy, was created in 2002 and has seen an 18% reduction in Scotland's suicide rate. The new plan aims to continue this reduction through a focus on how services can support people at risk of suicide whilst also delivering support to families and carers. Minister for public health Michael Matheson said: "Scotland has made real progress in suicide prevention. But we...

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    Pressures on adult safeguarding is rising

    The Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) have reported that professionals investigated 112,000 referrals in 2012-13 which is up from 108,000 the previous year. There was also a more significant rise in the number of alerts of suspected abuse of adults, reports Community Care. Councils must now examine alerts to see if they meet safeguarding thresholds and thereby become referrals...

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    81 Year Old Woman Left To Starve, Dies - Council Staff Suspended

    Foster died in Epsom hospital 11 days after being admitted.The serious case review into the death of Gloria Foster, published on Monday by Surrey Safeguarding Adults, says:"Council officials neglected to call her to make alternative care arrangements when the care company looking after her was raided and closed down by immigration officials."An official subsequently attempted to cover up the...

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    Help for those suffering with Dementia

    Dudley Metropolitan borough council have developed a new Dementia Gateway Service which has been in operation since November 2011 and aims to integrate early diagnosis and medical intervention for people with dementia and provide social care to enable the person to keep their independence. The Gateway Service is based on a multidisciplinary team approach which involves initial assessments by...

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    Prevention Matters - The Buckinghamshire Model

    The care bill intends to implement new models of working, allowing older and vulnerable adults to lead healthy, fulfilling lives. This can be gathered from the white paper that has preceded the bill, which says ""Failure to support people at an early stage means that many people are needlessly admitted to hospital because they have an accident or crisis and lose their independence."...

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    High number of care homes have illegally poor standards

    Figures from the Care Quality Commission (CQC) show that the number of official warnings being issued has risen by 43% in just one year.  Inspectors found that staff were falsifying medical records and failing to investigate claims of abuse and residents were being put at risk from scalding waters whilst left in filthy and unheated rooms.It is believed that the catalogue of failings have...

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    Changes to Cornwall Council could leave vulnerable adults unable to pay for care

    Cornwall Council have said that they are going to have to act to bring down its adult social care bill as projections show that in the next 20 years, a quarter of Cornwall's population will be over 65 with the number of people aged over 85 expected to double.The proposals that are being put out for a three month consultation include a wide range of changes.  There will be a removal of the...

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    A new way to help protect vulnerable adults

    To ensure adult protection and safeguarding is effective the decisions taken by practitioners have needed to be based on accurate risk assessment. There appears to be a lack of consistency when it comes to information sharing between agencies and the time for keeping information to one agency is over. It has been stated that risk management plans should be multi-agency, complete to the individual...

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    Adass Warns of Risk of Changes on Adult Social Care

    Last week the government published new eligibility criteria in an attempt to end the postcode lottery of adult social care; the new rules state that all councils in England would have to fund social care services for anyone deemed to have 'substantial needs'.These are designed to be the equivalent to the 'substantial' band that is currently in place, and as 86% of councils already use this as the...

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    Postcode Lottery in Social Care to End?

    The draft rules will come in to force from 2015 and is an attempt to remove the postcode lottery that older and disabled people are affected by in social care. This is when different local authorities offer different services depending on what they have available, so a person's needs would qualify for assistance in some areas and not in others creating social care assistance subject to...

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    Lamb Asks For Help Improve Home Care

     Norman Lamb held a summit yesterday with home care providers and care workers on how to improve standards across the home care sector.He is hoping this will help improve the quality of care as well as the working conditions for staff. The current system is encouraging the standards to slip as poor care, low wages and neglect are all linked.Using a recent BBC broadcast where a woman's family...

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    More Specialist Housing Needed for Dementia

    The National Housing Federation (NHF) have released a report urging the government to keep up with the increasing need for specialist housing. Dementia: Finding housing solutions shows that good adapted housing is crucial in supporting people with the illness and can play a crucial role in helping people with dementia live independently for longer.The report says that early intervention can...

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    Are GPS tags for Dementia Patients barbaric?

    It has been introduced by Sussex police for the tags to be attached to older care patients who are likely to wonder off, as Sussex Police have estimated that one-in-four of more than 300 missing persons inquiries it launched in 2011 involved a dementia patient.A number of local authorities are already using similar devices to track sufferers, but this is believed to be the first time a police...

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    Integrated Care May Suffer from New Funding System

     The report by the think tank has said that critical issues of how and where NHS funds are allocated are being overlooked in the heated debates over the wider health service reforms.Published today, the report warns that the changes to the NHS funding system make the funding more fragmented and risk creating ‘confusion and complexity’, which could result in undermining the government’s...

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    Midlands Council needs to cut £68m

    Council tax is being is being frozen for the forth successive year after already having had to save £80 million.Roger Lawrence, leader of the Labour-led council, said:If we could deliver the same service out of a smaller number of buildings... that is a priority.We have already had to save £80m over the last four years and this year we once again have to cut budgets to the tune of £17m in...

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    Social Worker driven to Suicide after Workload increases

    Lancashire social worker, Julie Dugdale, was found hanged by members of her family the day after visiting her GP complaining of feeling anxious. She had become a social worker in 2010, but she was made to reapply for her job as a co-ordinator after a reshuffle in the department, and found the situation very stressful.After the reshuffle, her workload had significantly increased and now involved...

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    1.2 million Public Sector Job Cuts will Deteriorate Services

     The Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), have forecast in their Green Budget 2013 that an additional 300,000 jobs would need to be shed in the three years following the next fixed-term parliament in 2015, if government departments maintain the same trajectory of planned cutbacks.The budget shows that government's plans will mean that departmental spending is forecast to be cut in real terms by...

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    Care Worker pay cuts against employee rights

    Jane Miller, deputy chief executive and chief operating officer of Care Plus said they now had no option but to examine spending on staff costs, which make up nearly 80% of the organisation's outgoings.Care Plus provides community nursing, specialist nursing for conditions as diabetes, drug and alcohol misuse, home care, learning disability and end of life services, and want to implement...

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    Further Cuts to Adult Social Care

    The figure for 2013-14, which does not take inflation into account, comes on top of estimated cash reductions of 3.3% in 2012-13 and 4.7% in 2011-12, and as pressures for services are high with 2012 being a record year for applications for care proceedings.The government revealed that councils in England would face spending reductions of up to 8.8% from April, with an average cut of 1.7%.Local...

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    Rise in Abuse Alerts shows Improvements in Safeguarding

    The report, Abuse of Vulnerable Adults in England 2011-12: Experimental Statistics show that 41% of all concluded cases were substantiated abuse, which is physical, sexual, emotional, financial, discriminatory or institutional abuse or neglect had been found on the balance of probabilities. This has risen by 13% since the previous year.Ccare staff are the most common perpetrators of the abuse,...

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    Personal Budgets are proven to improve care

    Norman Lamb has announced that the government will invest £1.5 million in implementing the personal budgets before 2014 to those who receive continuing care, which is around 56,000 people.The pilot for the scheme, which took place over the last three years, showed that there were significant improvements in the quality of life and mental well being of those involvedThe evaluation showed that the...

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    Social Workers are inadequate with Personal Budgets

    Personal budgets had increased opportunities to get out of the house and socialise and boosted independence, including because being able to employ a personal assistant made them less reliant on family.Service users and family members said their care was better because of the greater choice and control they had over services, with some changing providers with which they were not happy, according...

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    Council has failed to promote equality for disabled and older people

    Devon Council increased fees by an average of 6.6% in 2012-13, following two consecutive years of fee freezes and resulted in local care homes raising this with the high court.Judge Milwyn Jarman QC concluded that the consultation process was "a fair one which gave a sufficient opportunity for a meaningful response", and the way that it calculated the costs faced by providers was "based on...

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    Council cuts are permanently changing services

    Councils will cut £10bn from their social care budgets over this spending review period, MPs have been told. This was revealed at a health select committee hearing yesterday, where John Jackson, chair of the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services’ resources network told MPs that his figure raised serious concerns about the future of social care funding.He warned that adult social...

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    NHS Confed's issues with Personal Budgets and Integrated Care

    Interest in how to better join up health and social care has reached a peak in recent years, with particular focus since the passage of the Health and Social Care Act 2012.Various solutions have been tried and tested in recent years - local area partnerships, joint financing arrangements, care trusts and now health and well-being boards.The direction of travel for personal budgets in social care...

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    Home care workers are not being properly vetted

    Care Minister Norman Lamb said it did not show "the whole system" totalling about 6,000 operators had failed.The Care Quality Commission supplies care operators with guidance on "suitability of staffing" to ensure they comply with the standards demanded by the Health and Social Care Act 2008.CQC requirements relating to workers require home care providers to have effective recruitment and...

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    DOH: rare conditions that should be commissioned nationally

    The services listed in the report will be commissioned by the NHS Commissioning Board from April 2013, rather than by Clinical Commissioning Groups. The list will be agreed by Ministers and the Commissioning Board in the autumn.The CAG was established to advise the government on which specialised services should be commissioned nationally. The group is chaired by Dr Kathy McLean and ...

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    Figures find thousands of benefit claimants died after found fit for work

    Over 80 people a month have died shortly after being declared “fit to work” prompting campaigners to call for an overhaul of the government’s welfare system, reports the Guardian.Figures from the DWP have found that 2.380 people died between December 2011 and February 2014 shortly after being found fit to work. Campaigners have called the administration of the work capability assessment...

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    Disability campaigners concerned over benefit shakeups

    The Work and Pensions Secretary Iain Duncan Smith is set to announce new reforms to sickness benefits in the hope to get more people into work, reports the Guardian.It is expected the Mr Duncan Smith will claim that over 2 million more people are in work and that the number of workless households is at a record low following previous government reforms. “There is one area on which I believe we...

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    Single parents are being hit by benefit cuts

    Government statistics detailing who has been affected by the policy have found that in May 2015 49% were single parents with children under the age of five, reports the Guardian.It is being said that these figures reveal the benefits cap to be penalising parents who would find it most difficult to find suitable work, and critics are calling for single parents with children under the age of five...

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    Government to review helping benefit claimants back into work

    Led by Professor Dame Carol Black, the inquiry will consider the case for linking people who are entitled to benefits with accepting appropriate treatment or support, reports 24dash.The review's remit includes:Prime Minister David Cameron, said: "Over the next five years I want to see many more people coming off of sick benefit and into work and Carol Black will report back to me on how best to...

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    Call for review of benefits delivery

    The inquiry will look at the problems that could occur when benefits are underpaid or delayed, reports 24dash.  The Committee invites written evidence on: Frank Field MP, chair of the committee, said:  “My own hunger inquiry found that the department could straight away cut by a third the numbers of people having to rely on food banks, if it could ensure all legitimate benefit claims were...

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    11,400 tenants could be affected by new benefits cut

    Inside Housing have analysed data from the government's Stat-Xplore website and has found that 11,449 social housing tenants are set to be affected by the governments plans to remove housing benefit to young people aged 18-21 claiming Jobseeker's Allowance. Single parents, care leavers and those classed as vulnerable will be exempt from this cut. The policy was announced by the Prime Minister at...

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    Deaths due to benefit sanctions should have independent investigations

    A report into benefit sanctions by the Work and Pensions Committee has said that suicides linked to sanctions should be scrutinised in a similar manner to deaths in police custody, reports Inside Housing.A review of the systems of benefit sanctions was also called for in the report; however the government has previously rejected a call for an independent review in January.The DWP told the...

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    Charity finds benefit sanctions regime to be flawed

    A report conducted for Crisis by the Centre for Regional Economic and Social Research at Sheffield Hallam University found that benefit claimants were subject to a ‘postcode lottery' on whether or not their benefits would be reduced as a penalty for not finding work, reports Inside Housing.‘Around half of all "reconsidered" decisions are overturned and many JCP (Job Centre Plus) advisor...

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    Cuts to employment and support allowance benefits

    With these cuts it could see new claimants being given just 50p more per week than people who are on job seekers allowance, reports the BBC. The Department for Work and Pensions have said the ESA proposals were not government policy.The papers reveal that the government has also been forced to hire extra staff to clear the backlog on the benefit.Employment and Support Allowance is paid to...

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    Proposed benefit rule labelled ‘worse than poor law'

    The Social Security Advisory Committee is currently cons ulting on the proposals which George Osborne first announced in June 2013, reports Inside Housing.The seven day wait would occur on top of the month and seven days is the current wait for universal credit claimants who make a claim before receiving benefits.Sam Lister, policy and practice officer at the CIH, said the institute has...

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    Plan for pre-paid benefit cards

    Iain Duncan Smith, the Work and Pensions Secretary, has said that this would help "on the margins break the cycle of poverty" reports the BBC.The cars will only be able to purchase some items in some stores and will not be valid in betting shops or off licences. It will initially be piloted on a voluntary basis and will target people who have addiction problems.An estimated one in 15 working-age...

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    Update for benefit sanctions process

    The government is planning to overhaul the way it treats benefit recipients threatened by sanctions due to an independent report it commissioned has revealed systematic failings in the process which includes disproportionate burdens placed on people with the most vulnerabilities, reports the Guardian. The report revealed that the way in which the Department for Work and Pensions communicated...

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    Proposed cap on child benefit to cut welfare spending

    A report by Policy Exchange says that child benefit should be limited to four children per household and reduced to bring down welfare spending. Researchers for the thinktank argue that this can be justified due to the arrival of a first child tends to have the biggest impact on family finances and believe this move could save around £1bn over the course of a parliament, reports the...

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    Benefit claimants may have to undergo mental health treatment

    The Daily Telegraph has reported that the government is trialling a scheme in which rules excluding treatment for anxiety and depression from becoming a condition of sickness benefits are lifted, reports Inside Housing.A series of pilots combining help to work initiatives and mental health treatments led by the Department of Health and the Department for Work and Pensions are due to be expanded...

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    60% of households hit by benefit caps are families with children

    Statistics from the Department for Work and Pensions show that 60% of affected households had between one and four children, with 36% have five or more.Figures from the DWP show, that since the introduction of the benefit cap on 15th April 2013 to March 2014: •        Overall 42,200 households have had their housing benefit capped; the figure for March 2014 stood at...

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    Unemployed will have to take ‘basic steps' before receiving unemployment benefits

    The employment minister, Esther McVey, is said to be planning to launch a significant government push on welfare this week by stating unemployed people must prepare for their first interview with a Jobcentre Plus adviser by preparing a CV whilst also setting up an email address and register on the government's jobs website, reports the Guardian.This is due to the government wishing to put an end...

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    Benefit claimants' credit records can be accessed by bailiffs

    Bailiffs are now able to access benefit claimant's credit reference records in a bit to reduce the amount of fraudulent claims. The move is aiming to make it easier to confiscate high-value possessions if claimants have failed to pay back benefits that have been fraudulently claimed.Until last year the DWP were only able to access credit reference records on an ad hoc bases it there was a...

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    Lie detector tests used to catch benefit frauds

    Although the government has dropped this use of technology as they believe it to unreliable, 24 local authorities responded to freedom of information requests confirming they were using or considering the use of "voice risk analysis" software. In 2010 the DWP announced that they had given up using VRA software, however the FOI responses highlighted that some councils were still spending millions...

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    Thinktank finds 70,000 job seekers' benefits withdrawn unfairly

    Policy Exchange have said that almost a third of all people who break their hob search conditions for the first time have had their benefits removed by mistake and consequently face unnecessary hardship as a result, reports the Guardian. Guy Miscampbell, the author of the Policy Exchange report, said: "It is clear that there are a significant number of people who have their benefit taken away...

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    Watchdog says sick and disabled are getting hurt from mismanagement of benefits

    A spending watchdog has found that sick and disabled people trying to claim a new benefit, which has been introduced by Iain Duncan Smith are facing "distress and financial difficulties" due to mismanagement.The National Audit Office have discovered that the new personal independence payment, which is meant to replace the disability living allowance, will cost almost three and a half times more...

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    Record amount of sanctions made against benefit claimants last year

    Figures published by the DWP show the total number of sanctions against benefit claimants in the year to September 2013 was 897,690, which is the highest figure for any 12-month period since the introduction of jobseeker's allowance in 1996.In the year to 30 September 2013 the number of JSA sanctions was 874,850 which compares to 500,000 in the year to 30 April 2010. In the same period there were...

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    Labour finds 70,000 people in council tax arrears due to benefit cuts

    According to the Independent newspaper, the party has issued requests under the Freedom of Information Act to all English councils and 143 responded showing figures of 30,761 people being issued with bailiff notices. If this figure was to be inferred across England, it could mean that 70,000 people are being affected, reports Inside Housing. Due to council tax benefit being replaced with a grant...

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    Council of Europe says the level of UK benefits is inadequate

    This inadequate level is due to the fact it falls below 40% of the median income of European states. The finding comes from an annual review of the UK's adherence to the council's European social charter and is said to likely provoke a new dispute between the government and European legal structures.  Whilst the Council of Europe has said the conclusions were legally binding, the DWP suggest the...

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    MPs say many benefit claimants wrongly lose benefits due to ‘haphazard' approach to assessment

    The work and pensions select committee have said that claimants were in many cases wrongly losing their benefits due to a "haphazard" approach of assessing claimants meaning that individual needs or problems were often misunderstood. Their report claims that jobcentre staff refer many claimants for a benefit sanction inappropriately or "in circumstances in which common sense would dictate that...

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    Over a million sickness benefit applicants found to be ‘fit for work'

    The DWP claims that 980,400 people were judged capable of work between 2008 and March 2013; 32% of new applicants for Employment and Support Allowance. Over a million others withdrew their claims after interviews. Disability campaigners have said that the work tests were "ridiculously harsh and extremely unfair". A spokesman for Disability Rights UK has said that many of those passed fit will not...

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    Labour's plans to remove benefits from claimants lacking skills

    Under these new plans new claimants of Jobseeker's Allowance would need to sit basic skills test within six weeks. This move is set to be unveiled by MP Rachel Reeves in her first major speech as shadow work and pensions secretary; however the Conservatives accused her of producing an inferior copy of one of their policies.Labour estimates that 300,000 people a year could be affected, reports the...

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    Parents could receive a fine due to child benefit changes

    Over a thousand parents have not signed up to fill in self-assessment forms due to the government's child benefit tax change, and only have days left before they risk a fine.Calculations by HM Revenue and Customs suggest that 1.1 million people are affected by the changes which were introduced in January 2013. This means that households where someone earns more than £50,000 face a tax clawback...

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    New campaign targets benefits overpayments

    Claimants in six pilot areas have been warned that if they fail to disclose a new job or if they have moved in with a partner they could face fines of up to £2,000. The campaign will last three weeks and make use of multimedia such as adverts, posters, social media and letters. Lord Freud, the welfare reform minister, has said the campaign aims to stop fraud and overpayment "before they even...

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    ‘Economic recovery' placing many onto housing benefit

    A report by the National Housing Federation's  named ‘Home Truths' has found that around 310 people a day are having to go on housing benefit due to unemployment or low wages. The NHF says that taxpayers have picked up a tab of £12.1 billion spent on housing benefit for working people since 2009 due to the lack of homes in areas of growth over many successive years, reports 24dash.The NHF...

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    Almost 1,000 Scottish households have had their benefits capped

    The Department for Work and Pensions has said that the measures have been applied to 977 Scottish Households between April and October this year. However many say that the cap leaves underlying issues for claimants unaddressed, reports the BBC. The Work and Pensions Secretary, Iain Duncan Smith said: "These figures highlight our commitment to support those who want to work hard and get on and to...

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    Housing association tenants ‘working but claiming benefits'

    Launched this week by the g15 group of London's largest housing associations, The Real London Lives project shows that only 21% of tenants are unemployed. 60% of people need housing benefit to pay all or part of their rent, the research by Centre for Housing Policy at University of York has found, reports Inside Housing.The project will look at the effect of the welfare changes on 1,640 tenants...

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    Sanctions against benefits claimants climb

    The number of benefit claims subject to sanction is at the highest it has ever been since statistics began to be published, the Department of Work and Pensions figures show. The figures have been delayed for months and show that since the new benefit regime was introduced last October. Many unemployed people have had their benefit payments suspended due to either a failure to look for work,...

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    Benefit cap showing little signs of improvement

    The benefit cap which affects the amount of benefits that non-working people aged between 16-64 can receive has been piloted in four areas in the UK, and will begin to roll out across the rest of the country soon. The cap also sees that couples and lone parents will receive a maximum of £500 a week and single people will be limited to £350.The Chartered Institute of Housing have looked at one...

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    No confidence vote from council for Atos

    Atos is a French multinational IT services corporation that carries out assessment of people's eligibility for a range of disability benefits. These include employment support allowance and the new personal independence payment which has replaced disability living allowance.The vote of no confidence from Islington Council comes after an investigation raised significant concerns about the...

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    450,000 in court due to council tax arrears

    Carers, widows and war veterans are just some of the vulnerable people who are facing court due to being unable to pay their council tax after having their benefits cut. Local government secretary, Hillary Benn, has said that the figures show that David Cameron has imposed a new poll tax that has disastrous consequences on the poor, so that many are now facing the threat of prison. "Disabled...

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    The DWP to bring in additional providers due reports of 'poor quality' of Atos assessors

    Following on from this criticism Atos has received over the past months, the announcement made by Mark Hoban, the employment minister, means the additional providers will be brought in on a regional basis from summer 2014. Hoban said the extra firms will help provide extra capacity to help shorten waiting times.An article from The Guardian reports the following from Hoban:I am committed to...

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    Benefits Cap Begins Roll-out Across Britain

    The cap which affects all people of working age was introduced in April in four London boroughs - Croydon, Bromley, Haringey and Enfield.It was made to ensure that benefits payments do not go beyond the income of the average working household.The cap began being rolled out in other places on Monday and will be fully implemented by the 30th of September.Benefits that are involved include...

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    Issues With Work Capability Assessments By Atos

    Mr Rolph is a disabled man with post-traumatic stress disorder from suffering domestic abuse.Earlier this year he had his benefits cancelled after an assessment with Atos. As a campaigner for men suffering domestic violence, this instigated him to start a hunger strike to highlight the injustice of this.After the start of his protest, the Department of Work and Pensions admitted fault and...

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    Disabled Man on Hunger Strike over Benefit Cuts

     Mr Rolph, was wrongly classed as fit to work from an assessment by Atos, and has gone on a hunger strike out of protest.The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) have now admitted the error and reinstated the benefit, after months of struggle without it.However, Rolph is continuing the strike so that people hear his anger towards Atos and the government for the treatment of the disabled, the...

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    WCA is Declared Too Difficult to Navigate

    Two people with mental health problems have taken the case to court as they have said the system discriminates against them. This is because people who have conditions such as theirs may lack insight can struggle to gather the right documents needed for a successful claim, such as doctors' reports.They put forward that where a claim is from someone with a mental health problem, it should be the...

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    Independent Living Fund Court Challenge Lost

     The money given to disabled people is to aid an independent life. The average amount given is £300 per week, and is used to enable disabled people to employ assistants to help them with their personal needs, and to work and play an active part in their communities.The government have proposed that when they remove the fund in 2015, local councils will take over the short fall, but campaigners...

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    PIP assessments to be more empathetic

     Atos have come under heavy criticism since the beginning of the governments reforms of disability benefits. They are the company that runs the Work Capacity Assessment (WCA) for employment and support allowance and has been awarded the contract for PIP assessments for Scotland, the north and the South of England.There has been a lot of upset caused by the changes, in particular with the...

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    Concern Over New Disability Benefit Allowance

     The new benefit to replace Disability Living Allowance (DLA) is starting to be introduced this month in parts of northern England, and will gradually be rolled out nationally from June.It has been introduced as part of an overall reform of the welfare budget, and concerns have been raised about the effect this will have on the quality of life for the people who have disabilities.Combined with...

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    The Change from DLA to PIP begins

     The process of changing to PIP is beginning today. It is introducing tighter controls on who receives benefits, and more regular checks on long term illnesses.The change to PIP is starting with places in the north of England being the first to be moved over, and will begin nationally in June.Last year, the total number of people claiming DLA was 3.2 million, and studies by the Department for...

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    JRF Comment on Postcode Poverty Report

    Read full blog by Chris Goulden,Head of Poverty at the Joseph Rowntree Foundation. 28/3/13 The national Council Tax Benefit (CTB) scheme has been abolished and local authorities have had to devise their own systems, albeit with 10% less funding. A decision was made by the UK government to protect pensioners, which means tax rises are mainly being passed onto those of working-age.Although nearly...

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    Food Vouchers Instead of Cash for Support

     Tens of thousands of vulnerable people who would normally receive a cash loan when in financial crisis, will now be issued with food vouchers instead.It is available as an emergency government run social fund for people who are already on a tight budget, but have money stolen, or their benefits are delayed, and the loan is repaid in deductions from future benefits.It also includes grants that...

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    Atos subcontract NHS trusts for PIP

    Last year it emerged that Atos in Scotland were subcontracting the Lanarkshire NHS, which raised questions last year from MPs over whether it represented value for public money for the state to contract work to a private company if the work was then outsourced back to the state.This week, Atos published a list of the 14 “supply chain partners” that it has made agreements with to do most of...

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    Carers Benefits will be cut by £31m

    Carers UK has condemned the 11th hour publication of Government analysis which shows that cuts to disability benefits will result in a knock-on reduction of at least 10,000 in the number of people eligible for Carer's Allowance.The main benefit for carers, Carer's Allowance, is linked to the benefits of those they care for - currently Disability Living Allowance, which is to be gradually replaced...

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    Support for benefits to be on pre-paid cards

    The pre-paid cards are already taking off, with a quarter of all councils using them in some capacity, and those who use the cards are considering rolling them out on a wider basis.They have the advantage of being cheap to administer, and allowing people to use them in instances where cash is not accepted. They can also be set up so that money is put on every month, but that there's a weekly...

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    ATOS Healthcare Debated in Parliament

    Opening the debate, Meacher said 1,300 people had died after being placed in the "work-related activity group", for those currently too ill to be in a job but expected to take steps towards an eventual return to employment:Atos is an IT firm and uses a so-called logic integrated medical assessment, often described as rigid and tick-box because computer-based systems make it very difficult for...

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    Disproportionate Cuts for Disabled People and Carers - Speak out Now!

    Pat Onions launched Pat's Petition a year ago to alert people to the losses disabled people will face with the planned changes to benefits. The petition demanded a review of the cuts to benefits and services which are falling disproportionately on disabled people, their carers and families.  She called for a Cumulative Impact Assessment.The campaign has prompted the Labour Party to devote an...

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    Cuts from reforms may clash with "troubled families" initiative

     The ‘troubled families' initiative was launched by prime minister David Cameron in August 2011, in the wake of the riots in London and other cities. The programme aims to turn around the lives of 120,000 families with a history of anti-social behaviour.But CPAG said its research into the impact of welfare reform on local authorities showed ‘conflicts' between the changes and other...

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    Technology could limit how benefits are spent

    Max Wind-Cowie, who runs Demos' progressive conservatism project, said:I believe there is scope, because we have the technology to make it a reality, but not only because we have the technology, to use our ability to have more control over what people spend the state's money on.He said the idea could be used to differentiate between benefit claimants that have paid into the welfare system through...

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    New Care Bill to "Empower" People to Make Their Own Choices

    He told MSPs at Holyrood that the Social Care bill would give people control over their own budget.Ministers have pledged £23m across three years to local councils for the implementation of the bill.However, local authority body Cosla believed the true cost of the plan could be between £50m and £90m.At its heart, the bill proposes the introduction of a direct payment to fund alternatives to...

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    CARE HAS IMPROVED CONSIDERABLY IN ENGLAND

    Almost three fourth of 372 care homes rated inadequate in 2014 and still operating have improved.205 care homes have improved from a low rating to requiring improvement, 68 are now rated good and 99 did not have their rating changed.Also, 34 which were rated deficient in 2014 have since closed.The BBC reports that there now exists a tougher inspection system which was created in October 2014;...

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    NHS ADJUSTMENTS TO BUDGET CUTS

    NHS trusts which have been previously rated good or outstanding will not be inspected as frequently as before, but those rated as inadequate will be regularly visited by the CQC.The Guardian reports the fear of critics, which is that "unchecked data from hospitals may not always be reliable and is a poor substitute for a detailed inspection."According to Miriam Deakin, head of policy, NHS...

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    Government to inspect if housing can reduce NHS costs

    In the Budget document the government have said it's looking at the ‘cost-effectiveness of options to integrate spending around some of the most vulnerable groups of people.' This includes ‘exploring whether improving housing can help people with care needs to stay in their homes longer and reduce costs to the NHS.' The Treasury document does not reveal exactly what this would entail,...

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    End of life patients are lacking support

    The charity has found that almost 92% of NHS clinical commissioning groups do not provide round the clock telephone helplines, reports the BBC.Guidelines say there should be 24-hour telephone services and the NHS says it is "working hard to make changes".Out of 180 CCGs which responded to requests for information from the charity, only 8% said their local area had a dedicated 24-hour help line...

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    Social care is being limited due to council cuts

    ADASS are warning that cuts are making the care system "unsustainable" with charities saying hundreds of thousands of people are struggling without help, even though the government says councils have been given an extra £1.1bn to help protect social care this year, reports the BBC.In 2010-11, Adass says 72% of councils in England only offered help with care to adults with substantial or critical...

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    Young people should not be placed in B&Bs says MPs

    The Commons Education Select Committee has said that B&B accommodation is "threatening and frightening" and should only be used in emergency situations reports the BBC.MPs say that young people should not have to leave care until they are 21.The MPs report suggests that the quality of preparation for a young person's transition from care to greater independence is "too often inadequate". They...

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    Special measures system designed to improve failing care homes

    A scheme similar to special measures of hospitals will be introduced for care homes and home care agencies next year, ministers will say, reports the BBC.This will cover 25,000 services and could lead to the closure of those that will fail to improve.The system is not expected to start until April due to the ratings regime it will based on will only be rolled out in the social care system from...

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    Research says that one in three Alzheimer's cases can be prevented

    The research says that the main risk factors of Alzheimer's is lack of exercise, smoking, depression and poor education, reports the BBC. Alzheimer's Research UK said age was still the biggest risk factor.The research found that a third of Alzheimer's cases could be linked to lifestyle factors that can be modified such as smoking and lack of exercise.They found that by reducing each risk factor...

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    NHS boss says those with vulnerabilities need joint health and care budget

    Simon Stevens wants to see older people, those with disabilities and people with serious mental health problems given joint pots from the NHS and council-run social care services, reports the BBC.This idea gives patients a nominal budget which they can decide to spend on whatever care and serves they wish. This is part of a drive to give patients more power. GP and emergency care is not included...

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    Council falters in reviewing autistic man’s care plan

    According to Community Care:"The ruling was made by the Local Government Ombudsman after the man's mother complained that his physical and mental health deteriorated in the two-year period after another man, Mr Y, moved into the supported accommodation where he lived....His mother says problems began earlier and that he was portrayed as the perpetrator in safeguarding reports but was retaliating...

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    Parents are calling for plastic bags to be banned from a mental health facility

    Ben Cowburn had committed suicide at Longreach House in Redruth in 2010. Three years earlier, another patient, Trenna Shaw had asphyxiated herself in the same way.The Cornwall Partnership Foundation Trust said it regretted the deaths but the number of suicides at Longreach House was not up to the national average.Trenna Shaw's father, Ray Hancock said:"It was very much an instant replay. It was...

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    Hospital beds are blocked due to social care problems

    New research has revealed that 2 million bed days in hospitals have been wasted since 2010 due to problems in social care meaning patients are unable to be discharged. This is leaving some elderly patients are being trapped in hospital for up to thirty days whilst waiting to be transferred to a residential home, even though they're fit to leave, reports the Guardian. An estimated total of...

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    Work places urged to become ‘dementia friendly'

    Dementia affects almost 700,000 people in England and many friends and family take on the role of carer. Public Health England predicts that in 2014 50,000 carers will have to quit their job and 66,000 more will have to make adjustments at work.Due to these statistics they are launching a new awareness campaign, reports the BBC. The new Dementia Friends initiative aims to show how a...

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    Poor social care for older people sees sacking and suspensions in one care home

    Filming at the Old Deanery in Essex has revealed that some residents were being taunted, roughly handled and one was even slapped. The home has said it was "shocked and saddened by the allegations".Secret filming by the BBC's Panorama has discovered, through an undercover reporter over 36 shifts, that: •         a woman slapped by a care worker who had previously been complained about...

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    £50m scheme sees GP's offering out of hours appointments and Skype check-ups

    In October the prime minister unveiled the £50m scheme due to fears of too many people turning up to A&E when appointments with GP's were unattainable, meaning too much pressure was placed on emergency departments. Doctors were invited to apply for funding and the money means that seven million patients at over 1,100 practises will see the trials begin over the next month.Labour, however has...

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    £5bn integration funding for health and social care

    Care and support minister, Norman Lamb, has informed a social care conference that the governments £3.8bn ‘Better Care Fund' would be supplemented by further funding from local authorities and clinical commissioning groups, reports the Guardian."Local areas have chosen to be more ambitious, to pool more of their budgets than we had asked them to," said Lamb. "This has to be the start of a...

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    The government is introducing new checks across the health and care sectors

    This would be a new fitness test for health and social care leaders."The consultation on this new legal duty runs until 25 April 2014", according to GOV.UK.Norman Lamb, Care and Support Minister said:"Scandals like Winterbourne View and Mid-Staffs damaged confidence in our health and care system. We are committed to rebuilding that trust and making sure that people at all levels are held to...

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    Wilful neglect could become a criminal offence

    Around 240 prosecutions a year alleging wilful neglect or ill-treatment of patients could soon be placed under a new criminal offence in England following the Mid Staffordshire hospital scandal. A consultation paper and impact assessment on the proposed new legislation says that individuals could face a £5,000 fine and/or up to five years in prison.  Far stiffer financial penalties could be...

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    25% budget reductions from pilot that helps people navigate care services

    Three pilots established by Homeless Link, Mind, Drugscope and Clinks have been evaluated and found to provide better and cheaper care. The pilots focus on a dedicated worker as a single point of contact for people engaged with homelessness services.The initiative called, Making Every Adult Matter, was piloted in Cambridgeshire and found costs related to crime, drugs and alcohol, mental health...

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    Badly performing care homes to be highlighted by new watchdog

    The Care Inspectorate, which inspects 14,000 care homes, nurseries and other support services, has said that it will notify the media when an organisation fails to meet standards and highlight them on its website, reports Inside Housing. Figures published last month show a 3% rise in complaints to the inspectorate in the second half of last year compared to 2012.Annette Bruton, chief...

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    Police being used to transport patients to hospital

    Figures obtained by the BBC highlight that in 2013 police in Essex took 185 patients to hospital and the East of England Ambulance Service said that they needed more staff.In March last year 22 patients were conveyed to hospital due to "execessive ambulance delays" or "no shows". There were 20 such occasions in July and 21 in October.There were 83 episodes classed as "inappropriate ambulance...

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    Patients visiting A&E 50 times a year

    Under the Freedom of Information act data from 183 sites showed that nearly 12,000 people made over ten visits to the same unit in 2012-13 with 150 people attending more than 50 times.Doctors have warned that whilst the issue is confined to a minority of patients it was adding mounting pressure on the system over the winter with many hospitals already struggling to hit their waiting times.In the...

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    Stafford hospital is to be taken over and lose key services

    Stafford hospital will see its consultant-led obstetric maternity unit replaced by a midwife-led unit and los all of its acute surgical services. Its A&E unit will operate from 8am to 10pm and handling less serious cases only will be made permanent.Trust special administrators appointed to turn around Mid Staffordshire NHS trust has said that the changes were necessary because it was "financially...

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    Ambulances face long waiting times at A&E

    Data collected for NHS hospitals in England, Scotland and Wales, which has been obtained by the BBC under the Freedom of Information Act, found that Wales had the longest wait time, but an ambulance in eastern England had to wait for more than five hours. The Welsh government said that the figures were unacceptable but most people waited less than half an hour.Patients have to wait in ambulances...

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    Over a thousand care home residents have died of dehydration

    Figures obtained under the freedom of information laws by the Telegraph show that 1,158 care home residents suffered dehydration related deaths between 2003 and 2012. Dehydration was named as either an underlying cause of death or contributory factor. 318 residents were found to have died from starvation or where severely malnourished and 2,815 deaths were linked to bed sores. Figures only...

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    Carers need more support says Older People's Commissioner

    Sarah Rochira is concerned that too many carers in Wales are missing out on help and find their work is often undervalued. Ms Rochira believes that this can often lead to a deterioration of the carers mental and physical health, reports the BBC. Ministers say that much has been achieved in policy to support unpaid carers since devolution.Ms Rochira on Carers Rights Day said that she is worried...

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    A big rise in winter deaths

    It is estimated that there were 31,100 excess winter deaths last year which is a 29% increase on the previous winter. The Office for National Statistics shows that many of the deaths included people aged over 75 and cold weather and flu were largely to blame.Last winter was milder than average in December however a prolonged period of lower than average temperatures occurred, reports the BBC.The...

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    The Government Has Spent Over 700 Million Pounds On Cold Weather Payments

    Housing News reports that Cold Weather Payments are made for each 7-day period of very cold weather - if temperatures are recorded as, or forecast to be, zero degrees celsius or below over 7 consecutive days.As winter kicks off, new figures reveal that the government has spent more than 706 million Pounds since 2010 with 28 million Cold Weather Payments aiding those most in need keep warm...

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    No improvement since Mid Staffs scandal

    No improvement has been made by hospitals in patient safety or treating the ill with dignity and respect after the Mid Staffordshire scandal reports the CQC. 47% of problems the CQC identified had a major or moderate impact on patients, which is more than the previous year when the visit was 39%. Poor care was found in 10% of all hospitals.The report said: "In the aftermath of the failures of...

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    Hospitals to pay for errors that result in injury or death

    As well as financial penalties, hospitals have to provide patients with a named consultant during their stay in an attempt to improve the safety of care across the NHS. Part of the plans also sees the legalisation of hospitals obliged to tell patients or relatives if treatment has harmed or killed someone through a new statutory "duty of candour" on providers of care. Doctors, nurses and other...

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    Hospitals must publish ward staffing levels

    Jeremy Hunt, the health secretary, has introduced monthly mandatory reporting of staffing levels on hospital wards, however is said that the idea of enforcing a fixed minimum nurse-patient ration will be rejected.The proposals have derived from the aftermath of the Mid Staffordshire scandal where hundreds of patients died due to poor failings in care. Hunt is said to be likely to propose that the...

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    Wilful neglect to be made a criminal offence

    Under changes made to NHS England and Wales following the numerous care scandals that have emerged recently wilful neglect will be made a criminal offence.  The offence will be modelled on one punishable act that could be punishable by up to five years in prison under the Mental Capacity Act. The proposals are said to be unveiled next week, however doctor's leaders have said that the threat of...

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    GP ten minute appointments to be removed

    There have been a number of requirements being removed during the latest round of contract negotiations between the government and doctors' leaders.On average consultations in England are said to last for around twelve minutes. In the new change GPs say they will be able to have greater flexibility over how they organise their appointments.The removal of the ten minute minimum slot for booked...

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    Seeking medical help early will ease pressure on A&E

    In a plan to reduce the pressure on A&E's ill people are urged to seek help sooner rather than later so that less patients go to A&E.Elderly and frail people with existing conditions can see these become worse in winter and NHS England say they shouldn't leave it too late to seek help. It has said that A&E departments become congested in winter as larger portion of frail and elderly patients who...

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    New two-tier plan to solve A&E crisis

    NHS England's medical director, Sir Bruce Keogh, has said that it is an illusion to think that all hospitals are as good as each other.  He says that it was absolutely necessary to rethink under-pressure A&E services because too many people turn up there who do not need emergency care. Almost 40% of people leave A&E without any treatment, frail and elderly people end up waiting hours and...

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    NHS patients at risk due to nursing cuts

    Some NHS hospitals are functioning with 20,000 less nurses than needed, a new report from ministers has warned.Across the NHS in England there are a total of 19,526 full-time nursing posts left unfilled due to the Whitehall-ordered drive to save £20bn by 2015 in "efficiency gains".The RCN's chief executive Dr Peter Carter, has said that the health service is about to be hit by "a hidden...

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    More pressure will be placed on A&E if NHS walk-in centres are closed

    Whilst NHS walk-in clinics are hugely popular almost a quarter of them have been closed in the past three years. Many of those offered seven-day care and evening opening hours.Health service regulator, Monitor, has said that there was a danger that closures could leave many patient without access to GP care. It is believed those hardest hit will be those unable to register with a surgery, as well...

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    Overcrowding in A&E's can cost lives

    The college of Emergency Medicine's dramatic intervention in the debate over how to relieve the pressure on A&E units comes during warnings that the NHS could be facing its toughest winter ever. The college has created a list of changes it wants NHS England and ministers to make and the college says that it is vital to "ensure 'exit block' does not occur. Crowding increases mortality," reports...

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    Hospitals are criticised for ‘avoidable' admissions

    According to the National Audit Office, there were 5.3m emergency admissions in the last financial year which is a 47% rise in 15 years, and many of these patients stayed in hospital for longer than necessary. It says that it is "critical" for the NHS to do better in dealing with issues to cope with rising winter pressures.NHS England has said that "big decisions" are needed to develop...

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    NHS Direct to close in 2014

    The organisation is believed to have gotten into financial troubles after winning a number of the contracts for the 111 telephone line. Whilst it had already said that it was pulling out of those, a new decision mean that its other services will also be closed or transferred to other NHS bodies, reports the BBC. The NHS Direct service began fifteen years ago and ran the national telephone advice...

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    1 in 4 hospitals are a cause for concern

    In one of the most comprehensive analysis's the CQC have ever carried out, 161 acute hospital trusts were looked at and of that number 44 have caused concern for the CQC.Performance in some areas is so poor that it could pose a risk or an elevated risk to patients.The CQC examined 150 national NHS-wide measures of quality and safety of care in a new assessment system it calls "intelligent...

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    From Next Year, There Could Be Tougher Care Quality Commission Checks On Home Care Providers

    There has been worries over the fact that home care visits limited to 15-minute slots are often too short and places huge pressures on both care workers and their clients. Housing news reported Lamb's speech to the National Children and Adult Services conference last week:"Fifteen minutes is not enough time to help people who are older or who have a disability to do everyday things like wash,...

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    Neglect is a main contribution to care home deaths

    The coroner, Penelope Schofield, has said that there was "institutionalised abuse" at Orchid View care home in Copthorne. She has said that those involved in the neglect should be "ashamed" and it has been announced that a serious case review has been set up.Ms Schofield said that  "There was institutionalised abuse throughout the home and it started, in my view, at a very early stage, and...

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    Review Over 15 Minute Home Visit Ordered By Care Minister

    Figures obtained by Leonard Cheshire, the largest voluntary sector provider of disabled care, found that in the past five years the proportion of visits lasting a quarter of an hour or shorter had risen by 15%. Almost two-thirds of local councils are now commissioning 15-minute visits.Experts say the reason for such tiny slices of care time is that cuts to council funding have led to a £2.6bn...

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    Hidden cameras in care homes

    Proposals unveiled by the Care Quality Commission have said that they will hold discussions over "the potential use of hidden surveillance".  Andrea Sutcliffe, the CQC's new chief inspector of adult social care, has outlined her priorities in a document entitled ‘A Fresh Start for the Regulation and Inspection of Adult Social Care', ahead of a public consultation next spring.The document...

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    Cancer carers are not given enough training

    Research by Macmillan Cancer Support asked more than 2,000 carers, both past and present, about the support they gave. 22% said that they had dealt with specific healthcare tasks, such as administering medicine and pain relief whilst other had to give injections.The charity wants the NHS to do more in supporting carers of people with cancer.Fewer than half the people asked said that they had...

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    NHS wards that are understaffed should be shut says lawyer

    Mr Francis believes that wards and units of hospitals which have too few nurses and doctors able to look after patients safely should be shut down. Mr Francis had an interview with the Guardian and explained that wards should be shut until hospital bosses are certain that they have enough experienced staff, and in the meantime patients should be sent elsewhere."If you haven't got the right number...

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    NHS patients have been told to fight for their rights

    Healthwatch England has urged the public to become "savvy consumers" rather than "grateful patients". They have set out eight core rights for patients.To help achieve that, the organisation has set out its list of rights:•         the right to essential services•         the right to access•         the right to a safe, dignified and quality...

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    15 minutes is not enough time to give vulnerable people dedicated care

     Despite concerns of how short care visits can deprive people with disabilities of essential care two-thirds of local councils are commissioning 15-minute visits.Leonard Cheshire, the largest voluntary sector provider of disabled care, created a survey which is the largest and most detailed of its kind by using freedom of information requests, receiving responses from 120 of the 152 county...

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    Pharmacist ‘physically sick' after carrying out checks at a Sussex care home

    Ms Campbell, who works as a pharmacist for Boots, says that the treatment room was filthy and chaotic and that one patient had gone without medication for four days, reports the BBC. In an inquest into the care home due to the deaths of 19 residents being unexplained, Ms Campbell said that there were gaps in patient charts where medication had not been administered correctly. When she brought...

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    Welsh Government's new care plan to cut sight loss

    In Wales nearly 100,000 people have sight loss problems and it is expected that that number could double by 2050, reports the BBC. Due to this the Welsh government have created an eye care delivery plan, which they say is pioneering. The Royal National Institute of Blind People has said that they hope it will mean fewer people suffered with preventable problems.Figures show that around 75% of...

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    New hospital inspection regime is underway in England

    Mike Richards, the new chief inspector of hospitals, is leading the overhaul of inspections into hospitals to ensure care is being given correctly. This will be done through a larger and more specialised team, reports the BBC.The inspectors will begin the first of eighteen inspections in Croydon before visiting other hospitals by the end of the year. After the inspection a public meeting will be...

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    Dementia carers found to have been give no information on key support issues

    It was also revealed that 52% of carers had faced difficulties obtaining a diagnosis for the person for whom they cared, and only 51% had been given the chance to talk separately about how much care they felt able to provide, reports Community Care. In addition to this, 68% of the 325 carers questioned had not had training or advice on dealing with the agitated behaviours that develop in the...

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    Revamp to patient care structure

    The Future Hospital Commission says the structure to bring care to patients needs to be revamped. This is largely to help frail people who have complex needs as they often face multiple moves once they've been admitted to hospital.  They propose that closer working with teams in the community is the way forward. Closer working with the community could involve doctors and nurses running clinics...

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    Support for blind people is falling

    As well as figures falling from 55,875 people to 31,740 since 2005, the charity fears that in ten years' time, not a single blind or partially sighted person will receive any support from their council if things carry on the way they are. As well as a drop in care, the RNIB research also found that a growing number of local authorities have restricted access to rehabilitation or only offer six...

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    The NHS needs to do more for those needing end-of-life care

    Sue Ryder is a provider of specialist palliative care who come across many incidents where patients and their families feel unsupported and unclear about what choices they have available to them when looking into end-of-life care. This is believed to be due to the NHS being more geared toward saving lives, but lack proper care for those with untreatable problems needing end-of-life...

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    Patients left at risk of abuse

    In Feburary an inspection of Blackheat hospital's Cygnet Wing, a psychiatric intensive care unit, found that "aspects of care did not fully protect people". In the inspections report, it was highlighted that care to NHS patients from 38 areas in 2011/12 failed to meet four of six care standards it was assessed against.The Cygnet Wing notified CQC of high number of safeguarding aleart throughout...

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    New end-of-life care to be put in place

    The Leadership Alliance for the Care of Dying People will bring together health and social care groups so that care is improved for people who are nearing the end of their lives.In a statement, NHS England said the independent review had called for a coalition "to lead the way in creating and delivering the knowledge base, the education, training and skills and the long-term commitment needed to...

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    Increasing difficulty to see a GP

    The Royal College of General Practitioners carried out a survey on 206 UK GPs and found that more than 70% were forecasting longer waiting times within two years. Eight in ten also said that they did not have enough resources to provide high-quality care with six in ten saying that patients in England are waiting longer than the recommended 48 hours.Primary care, including GP services, has become...

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    NHS waiting list at a five-year high

    With almost 2.9 million people on the waiting list for hospital treatment, the NHS have found themselves at a five-year high.Figures show that the waiting list for operations and other treatments in England has risen by almost a quarter of a million since June last year. This has caused concern surrounding patients waiting too long for medical attention.The pressure on A&E services have been...

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    East London hospital fails to give basic care

    Inspectors conducted unannounced visits to Whipps Cross hospital in May and June of this year, visitng the emergency, elderly, maternity and surgery departments. What was found highlighted that the hospital was failing to meet 10 of the 16 national standards of quality and safety. The CQC have subsequently issued three enforcement notices requiring improvements by the end of August.Concerns have...

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    Patients unnecessarily sectioned in order to secure hospital treatment

    Changes to mental health laws in 2007 were introduced in order to ease the pressure on psychiatric units through extending the treatment available out of hospital. Yet even with these changes compulsory detention has continued to rise with figures rising from 42,208 in 2008/09 to 44,894 in 2011/12.As wards are still at over-capacity, it is now hard for patients to access hospital treatment on a...

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    Study Finds That Most NHS Nurses Are Too Busy To Fulfil All Care Duties.

    Researchers also found that the most important aspects of care are regularly being left undone. Registered nurses (RNs) working in English NHS hospitals also complained that:"Care is needed but is often not done because of insufficient time.There is a strong relationship between RN staffing levels and the prevalence of care being left undone - and, the better the practice environment the...

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    Care Home Top-Up Fees Malpractice Should Stop

    There is a notion that some councils use top-up fees as a "secret subsidy" by which some councils limit their own costs.The councils should monitor these contracts and the government on the other hand should intensify its efforts in signing the care bill into law.Although, councils are in charge of paying the care home fees of poorer pensioners whose assets are below £23,250, their...

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    End of Life Preferences

    "Successive surveys have found that around two thirds of people say that home would be the place they would want to die - but research recently carried out by Demos for the charity Sue Ryder reveals that although 78% of people surveyed said that dying without pain was important to them, only 27% felt that home was a place where they would be free from pain during their final days."Since 2008, the...

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    Review calls for standardised training for healthcare assistants

    The review, carried out by Camilla Cavendish, Associate Editor, columnist and leader writer for The Times, said healthcare assistants who completed the certificate should be allowed to use the term "nursing assistant" in a bid to reduce the number of current job titles held by support workers. Currently there is 'no minimum training for healthcare assistants'.The introduction of the...

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    Children's Minister Speaks about Reforms in Residential Child Care

    He made it clear that children's homes will need to meet higher standards of safety and quality. A seven-month investigation into children's homes by BBC Panorama discovered that one in four children are placed in homes rated 'inadequate' or 'adequate' by Ofsted, and over half of children in residential care are placed away from their local area.Edward Timpson alleged that:"Children's...

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    CQC Inspections are 'Not Good Enough'

     Following a review of the CQC, Jeremy Hunt has said that the quality of the regulator's work is not good enough.Following allegations that the two former bosses of the CQC suppressed a report on their failings, there is a new management team in place.Mr Hunt says they are moving quickly to turn the standard of inspections around.He has acknowledged serious flaws with the way in which the CQC...

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    Young Carers Require More Attention

    Most young carers are oblivious of the fact that they are carers in the first instance and are left to fight their battles for too long.Their schools and health concerns becomes least important to them.Although, they may lonley, confused and scared but may not talk about this or reveal this to the public for the fear that they may be taken away from their families or the people they care...

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    Urged to Attend NHS "Shake-Up" Meetings to Query Proposals

     The changes are expected to include cutting specialist departments and restricting A&E services as they say currently they are spread too thinly, but the plans have been met with public and political opposition.NHS leaders believe services are currently spread too thinly and have warned that some specialist hospital services could collapse unless big changes are made to the way they are...

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    Autism:The Care System Fails...

    It has been three years since the enactment of the Autism Act which came to force in November 2009.It sets out a national autism strategy and states the responsiblities of the local authorities, to cater to the needs of people living with autism and particularly to the care of adults who may slip away from benefitting from the act.However, the study of over 1000 survey responses from the...

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    Dementia patients not receiving basic care

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) have said that the care for dementia sufferers is very varied as to whether standards are met.The health officials have released a set of basic standards that all patients should be able to expect from their care, as a way to enforce was should already be happening.The new guide lines say that dementia sufferers should live in housing...

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    Working Together is not 'radical enough'

     The revised guidance is due to come in to effect on 15th April, with the intention of changing the focus of the confusing culture of safeguarding, so that those who work with children, young people and families are able to focus on helping them.A Child-Centred System, a report released last year, highlighted the problems caused by too much red tape for social workersFollowin the recommendations...

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    Social Context shows up Health Inequalities

    Working for Health Equity: The Role of Health Professionals gives suggestions on how to tackle the health inequalities, using health professionals, based on evidence of case studies.It has been calculated that addressing health inequalities in the way the report suggests could save the NHS £5.5bn a year, and the Health Secretary said the NHS had a legal duty to reduce health inequality.The...

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    Health Care 'Struggling to Cope' with Dementia

     The CQC reviewed more than 20,000 inspections they had carried out as well as current data.Around one in three people over the age of 65 will develop dementia in their lifetime. It is estimated that there are around 800,000 people at the moment with the condition, but as people are living longer that figure is rising.The review found that, in hospitals, dementia patients were more likely to...

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    More cuts to Adults Services and Declining Quality

    The study shows that two-thirds of NHS finance directors and nearly three-quarters of directors of adult social services (DASSs) pessimistic about the financial outlook across their local health and social care system in 2013.36% of the directors said they were planning to reduce the volume of services that their council funded in the next year. They do not expect this to be with raise...

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    CQC find 26% of home care failed standards

    The CQC has expressed concern that there are so many areas that are not being taken care of correctly resulting in bad care for service users, highlighting that the care service is already under massive strain and is untended to and underfunded.Over 700,000 people above the age of 65 rely on care so that they can remain in their own home by having help with everyday tasks such as washing,...

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    DOH wants your help to Improve Social Care

    The aim is to establish a full set of NICE quality standards and guidance in order to improve the quality of social care.Some of the potential NICE standards for discussion in the consultation include:The role of NICE in driving up the quality of social care is outlined in The Caring for our Future White Paper.The 12 week consultation ends on 26 April 2013.You can respond to the consultation on...

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    Care Home Inspections don't reflect Patient Assessments

    The report by MP's found that the neglect cases have highlighted an area of inaccuracy, and residents are unable to trust the results of official inspections, and this area of misrepresentation is occurring because CQC is failing to to communicate the results of the inspections to the residents and their families, therefore no comparison is made.The CQC, which brought together three previous...

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    Mid-term Review on NHS and Social Care

    The NHS is one of our great national institutions. We believe that healthcare should be free at the point of delivery on the basis of need, not ability to pay. The NHS we inherited was overly centralised, insufficiently responsive to patients and ill-equipped to handle both the demands of an ageing population and the rising costs of treatment. That is why, as well as protecting the health budget,...

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    NHS Confed Wants to Invest More in Care

    He said:Untreated mental illness costs the NHS over £10billion in physical healthcare costs every year. And delayed transfers in care - often a result of the right support not being in place - currently cost the NHS £545,000 per day (approximately £200 million per year).Increasing money in these areas will help keep people out of hospital and leading independent lives, accessing care in their...

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    Join the Dignity in Care Campaign

    The Dignity in Care campaign was launched in November 2006 has over 40,000 registered Dignity Champions. They are part of a nationwide movement, working individually and collectively, to ensure people have a good experience of care when they need it. They include councillors, staff at all levels in NHS and social care, volunteers, service users, their carers and members of the public.The...

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    Negative register of Adult Care Staff

    Since the Winterbourne View case has highlighted a forgotten area of redulated monitoring for vulnerable people, a way to regulate poor care has been at the forefront of the government's priorities to prevent abuse in circumstances such as this.The social work regulator has published a policy statement setting out its intentions and proposals for regulating the adult social care workforce in...

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    Emergency Hospital Beds would be avoided with Better Social Care

    Annual figures on hospital performance published by the NHS watchdog Dr Foster found hospitals are so full, with most hospitals over 90% full for 48 weeks of the year, that staff are struggling to keep patients safe.And yet 11.9% of hospital beds were emergency admissions that could have been avoided if their conditions were better managed and should have been treatable out of hospital.The report...

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    CQC finds vulnerable people are receiving poor care

     CQC is finding that the increasing complexity of conditions and older people living longer are impacting on the ability of care providers to deliver person-centred care that meets individuals’ needs.There is an increasing pressures on staff, both in terms of the skills required to care for people with more complex conditions and in terms of staff numbers.Across 2,500 nursing homes, in 15%...

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    Wake up call to bad care in NHS

    The Patients Association said the 13 cases studies should act as a wake up call to change the culture of NHS.

    The review said that although there is a lot to be proud of, there are still too many patients were still being let down, and the culture of the NHS means poor care remains unchallenged and unchanged.

    The report Stories from the present, lessons for the future consists of...

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    Healthcare assistants taking over nursing roles to save money

    Putting vulnerable patients in the care of well-meaning but "unreliable" nursing assistants raises "serious concerns about public protection", a commission led by Lord Willis of Knaresborough, the Liberal Democrat peer, says in a report published today.Healthcare assistants are employed for simple tasks like keeping patients fed and hydrated or taking their temperature, but are not currently...

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    Patients may be turned away from homes as NHS drop funding by £s;250 p/w

    Strategic health authority NHS London has decided to impose a flat weekly fee of £700 for continuing care patients, but this is £250 less on average than is currently paid to providers, according to the English Community Care Association (ECCA), National Care Association, National Care Forum and Registered Nursing Home Association.They also condemned NHS London's decision to unilaterally impose...

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    Social Care Reform Urgent as Winterbourne patients still suffer

    Although the care home itself was closed immediately, the company the ran Winterbourne View, is still running. When the serious case review team tried to probe into their financial affairs the investigating team said "the door was shut on us".It has now been revealed that more than half of the people transferred after the abuse remain in similar hospitals, and 19 have been subject to further...

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    Quality of Life in Care Homes is Important!

    It suggests the ways to move forwards with the changing concept of social care needs, and to fit with the idea that older people have a voice, choice and control over their own lives.The report, My Home Life, was unveiled yesterday at the National Children and Adults Services (NCAS) Conference to promote the message that many care homes fail to engage with their community and lack support from...

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    'Power of Entry' to protect vulnerable adults from abuse

    Ninety-one per cent agreed that applying for and executing a warrant granting power of entry into a private household or private nursing home should only be undertaken by suitably experienced, trained and qualified social workers.Bernard Walker, chair of TCSW's Adults Faculty, said:Social workers have drawn parallels with other areas of social work practice, telling us that adult protection...

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    Delay in publishing the Francis Report will delay progress

    In 2009, a highly critical report by the Healthcare Commission revealed a catalogue of failings at the trust and said appalling standards put patients at risk. Between 400 and 1,200 more people died than would have been expected in a three-year period from 2005 to 2008, the commission said.In February 2010, an independent £11m enquiry into events at the trust found it had "routinely neglected...

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    Mother challenges Virgin Care takeover of mental health service

    The action is the first of its kind and raises questions about the way NHS and social services are contracted out to private companies. More than 4,000 children will be affected by the change, many of whom are extremely vulnerable.The mother, who cannot be named for legal reasons, says her two children, aged nine and 13, both of whom receive treatment for mental health problems, could be...

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    NHS change focus of specialists to include mental health and dementia

    Charities and doctors worry about reductions in cancer, heart and stroke funding in the NHS as the focus shifts to also specialise in other key areas.

    The board have decided to replace the large existing bodies in this area and the successor bodies will have far fewer staff and smaller budgets than the existing groupings of experts.The board said more patients would benefit because the new...

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    NHS "could get worse from 2013"

    The government has promised to protect the health service, but research by the King's Fund, based on interviews with 45 NHS finance chiefs, raises doubts; 19 expected care to get worse over the next few years and that 2013 could mark the turning point.Meanwhile, a BBC survey of 1,005 people suggested 60% believed services would have to be cut.The majority of the 45 NHS directors of finance who...

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    NHS Confed issues warning over £2b gap in social care funding

    Publishing a report called Papering over the cracks, the NHS Confederation analyses the demographic and financial trends in social care, assesses the impact on the NHS, and proposes a way forward.It calls for a cross-party political consensus that addresses both the immediate cash shortfall and the need for a long-term funding solution. Without further action on funding, even the basic social...

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    Yorkshire Care Home fined £165,000 after 93 year old suffocates

    Elsie Beals suffocated at Aden Court Care Home in Huddersfield in 2010 after being trapped in a gap between incorrectly fitted bed rails and her mattress.Mrs Beals had been put to bed by staff but had not been found until the early hours of the following morning after she had caught her neck on the bed rails. On two previous occasions, the 93 year old had injured her leg when it became lodged...

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    RCN adverts showcase how demanding nursing and care is

    The adverts, part of an RCN initiative called This is nursing, will appear on buses in the UK's major towns and cities, and underground stations in London. They show the skills in nursing and highlight the balance health care strikes between expertise and compassion.RCN Chief Executive & General Secretary Dr Peter Carter said it was time to celebrate the work nursing staff do on a daily basis.He...

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    Which? find that families are left picking up the pieces of poor care

    One daughter's diary told of her mother having her face washed with a flannel with faeces on it and being dressed in yesterday's soiled clothes.Others spoke of relatives going all day without food or drink, untrained staff using lifting equipment, muddled vital medication and alarm pendants being forgotten.But we also heard of fabulous care from agency careworkers who don't have enough time to do...

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    Challenges to changes: Adult Social Care flagged as biggest strain

    As arguments continued over recommendations made by the Dilnot Commission on how to pay for all this, the Department of Health pressed ahead with the social care white paper, Caring For Our Future: Reforming Care and Support, in July. This has been criticised by some as having a financial vacuum at its heart.With local authorities taking on more and more functions from the NHS as part of the...

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    Inspectors find care home had no crime checks on staff

    The Care Quality Commission (CQC) found four out of five areas checked did not meet the required standards.The watchdog said some staff had not had Criminal Records Bureau checks before starting work at the home, meaning vulnerable residents could be at risk.The CQC found incident reports were not being completed and safeguarding referrals were not always being made.Inspectors also said there...

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    Councils' Inefficient Social Care Assessments Waste �£300m

    Councils in England are wasting an estimated £300m on inefficient social care assessments, which should be used to help vulnerable residents, according to auditors.The Audit Commission found a wide cost variation across different authorities, and urged councils to focus on making their assessment processes more efficient. And it claimed that sharing best practice could fund care packages for an...

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    Review of Providing Information and Advice to Carers

    The department has today published a review of the service arrangements for providing information and advice to carers.Access to good information and advice is important in supporting carers to get the best from their own lives and assist them in getting the right help to maintain them in their caring role.Carers Direct provides an on line information point for carers, as part of NHS Choices, and...

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    New social enterprise to help adults with vulnerabilities

    Aspire Community Benefit Society is taking over the council’s Learning Disability Service for a five year contract, reports the Yorkshire Evening Post.This new model will see the Learning Disability Service being owned and operated by people who work for the service as part of a staff-led mutual.Councillor Lisa Mulherin, Leeds City Council’s executive member for health, wellbeing and adults,...

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    New app hopes to bring smarter housing for social landlords

    The ZONR app combines the latest intelligent sensor technology, smart data transmission and decision engine analytics to centrally monitor and support heating systems across social landlord’s housing stock, reports 24dash.Headed up by social housing technology entrepreneur Robert Dent, over the last 18 months ZONR has invested in research and development and has already conducted successful...

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    New model of care homes in Wakefield to go ahead

    WDH's vision was being able to help people live longer, healthier lives and see support by co-ordinated services delivered as close to their homes as possible under the banner of ‘Connecting Care', reports 24dash.This new model of care hopes to increase the likelihood for people to live independently and reduce the potential of deterioration which would result in the need for primary and...

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    App to support young people with autism with social interactions

    This new app launched by Samsung aims to help treat the inability to make eye contact. The app, called Look at Me, has been developed with Seoul National University Bundang Hospital and Yonsei University's department of psychology and allows children with autism to run a series of games, challenges and test which have been designed to improve their ability to make eye contact and enhance their...

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    3D maps could help people with visual impairments navigate cities

    The official mapping body for Japan GSI have already developed paper maps for those with visual impairments using embossed surfaces to mark out roads, and is now planning a programme which will do the same thing for digital maps, reports Springwise.The software will first differentiate between the motorways, railway lines and walkways from the rest of the landscape. It will then create a 3D model...

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    A paralysed man has been able to walk again following cell transplant

    Darek Fidyka, who was paralysed from the chest down following a knife attack in 2010, is now able to walk using a frame, reports the BBC. The treatment is a world first and was carried out by surgeons in Poland in collaboration with scientists in London. Details of the research are published in the journal Cell Transplantation.Mr Fidyka He said walking again - with the support of a frame - was...

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    Breakthrough blood test for Alzheimer's cure

    An international collaboration led by scientists from King's College London and Proteome Sciences has published a study identifying a set of ten proteins in the blood. This test will then predict the onset of Alzheimer's in the next twelve months in people with memory problems with 87% accuracy, reports the Guardian. David Cameron recently announced a drive to discover new drugs for dementia,...

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    Trials for Alzheimer's disease is declining

    US scientists have said there is an urgent need to increase the number of potential therapies being investigated. They say that only one new medicine has been approved since 2004, reports the BBC.The drug failure rate is troubling and higher than for other diseases such as cancer, says Alzheimer's Research UK. Between 2002 and 2012, they found 99.6% of trials of drugs aimed at preventing, curing...

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    Study into the possibility of delaying the onset of dementia

    One third of a million adults in the UK are taking part in a trial, funded by the Medical Research Council to try to predict what factors increases the risk of a person developing dementia.Each of the volunteers enrolled in the UK Biobank four to five years ago where they gave blood and urine samples, underwent fitness tests and gave answers on their health and diet. They also did a series of...

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    Scientists believe a blood test could detect the early signs of Alzheimer's

    Researchers have found that changes in the blood may signify Alzheimer's disease in its earliest stages. The study, published in the journal Nature Medicine, has identified ten molecules in blood with could be used to predict whether people will go on to develop mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer's with 90% accuracy, reports the Guardian. This research is the first that has been able to show...

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    Phantom limb pain eased by virtual arm

    Through the use of a computer-generate augmented reality patients can see and move a virtual arm controlled by their stump. Electric signals form the muscles in the amputated limb communicate with the computer and allow real-time movement, reports the BBC. One amputee, Ture Johanson, has said that his pain has reduced dramatically thanks to the new computer program, which he is able to use...

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    Stem cell trial to see if new ways to help heart attack victims is available

    The study involves 3,000 patients in eleven European countries and is aiming to show that the treatment can cut death rates and repair damaged tissue after a heart attack.Patients will receive a standard treatment which will widen their narrowed arteries. This involves inserting a small tube called a stent. Half of the patients will have stem cells taken from their bone marrow and injected to...

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    Blind eyes can "see light" with new drug

    Rods and cones in the retina have a job to react to light; however they can de destroyed by disease. A study in the journal ‘Neuron' has revealed that a chemical could give "support-duty cells" in the eye the power to respond readily to light. Experts have said that it was a fascinating concept which may lead to treatments, however more research was needed.Researchers at the University of...

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    X-ray app to be used for testing and training

    The app will helps to develop medic's skills whilst identifying the areas of weakness which can be worked on in training and potentially save lives, reports the BBC.Dr Tom Lynch, one of the founders, said, "This is the medical and IT worlds coming together in Northern Ireland and producing something which is really unique."The app gives immediate feedback and the more the doctor uses it, the more...

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    Bionic hand gives sense of touch

    Dennis Aabo, a Danish man, lost his left hand in a firework accident almost a decade ago and has recently received surgery connecting the nerves in his upper arm to a bionic hand.Mr Aabo said that the hand was "amazing". In the laboratory tests he was able to tell the shape and stiffness of objects he picked up, even when blindfolded, reports the BBC. Robotic experts from Italy, Switzerland and...

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    Gene therapy technique found to prevent blindness

    The operation involves inserting a gene into the eye cells which is a treatment which revived light-detecting cells. The doctors involved in the surgery believe that the treatment could be used to treat common forms of blindness in time. Leader of the research, Professor Robert MacLaren said he was "absolutely delighted" at the outcome. "We really couldn't have asked for a better result," he...

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    Medical glue could replace stitches

    This new superglue may eventually replace the need for stitches and staples in the heart, gut and blood vessel surgery believes a US team. Tests on pigs have shown that it can seal cardiac defects in seconds and withstand the forces inside the heart. The glue has been inspired by the sticking abilities of slugs and could be made available for human use within two years, reports the BBC.This skin...

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    Hope for heart tissue regeneration

    Experiments at Cardiff and Swansea university labs have seen Cell Therapy build hope for developing new treatments for heart failure over the next five years.The research team was co-founded by Nobel prize-winning scientist Sir Martin Evans. Cell Therapy Limited's executive director Ajan Reginald told BBC Wales: "We've identified what we think is a very potent type of stem cell which is heart...

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    By 2050 dementia cases are ‘set to treble worldwide'

    In the UK dementia research only receives one eight of the amount of funding spent on cancer, which charities say is insufficient. Therefore they have released the figures prior to the G8 dementia summit which will take place in London next week.Due to increasing life expectancies Alzheimer's Disease International expects a surge in the number of cases in poor and middle-income countries,...

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    Wheelchair controlled by body piercing

    Through the movement of a tiny magnet in tongue piercing sensors are able to detect and then convert the movements into commands which are able to control a range of devices. A team at the Georgia Institute of Technology had made the leap from body are to wheelchairs because of the suppleness of the tongue. The team said it was harnessing the tongue's "amazing" deftness.A large section of the...

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    Those at highest risk of heart attack could be identified

    A method of scanning the heart which uses high resolution images and radioactive traces could help doctors identify people who are at the highest risk of a heart attack. The test has been developed by researchers at the University of Edinburgh, can identify dangerous fatty plaques in the heart's arteries, which can lead to clots if they rupture, reports the Guardian.The radioactive tracers seek...

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    Computer software to spot cancer

    The software will estimate the risk of five types of cancer, even hard-to-detect conditions, based on the symptoms the patient presents. If it believes cancer to be a possible diagnosis it alerts the GP and suggests further tests. Some practises in England and Wales have been testing the software in a pilot scheme, which is partially funded by the Department of Health, reports the BBC.Macmillan...

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    Hope for lung cancer treatments

    Findings reported in Science Translational Medicine found that a study of 5,000 discovered that genetic profiling of lung tumours boosted survival rates through better targeting of chemotherapy drugs. This could lead the way for personalised medicine. Cancer Research UK has said that matching patients to a personalised treatment is still in its infancy, reports the BBC.The standard way to...

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    Adding human touch to prostheses

    When hugging or touching a fellow person we find it quite easy to judge how much force and power is needed to stop us from causing them injury or pain, however for someone fitted with prostheses this becomes more difficult as they are without the sense of touch. However, an experiment carried out by a group at the University of Chicago is soon to be making this possible.Prosthetic limbs have...

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    Not enough people are making end-of-life care plans

    Charity, Compassion in Dying, have commissioned a poll that shows only 4% of people have signed an advance decision of how they would like their end of life care carried out. Many wrongly believe that their families would be able to ensure that hospitals follow their wishes; however, without a directive a hospital will decide what treatment a person at the end of their life will receive if they...

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    New spoon to help people with Parkinson's

    People that suffer with Parkinson's disease can often find themselves struggling with controlling their body movements, resulting in shaking. Lift Labs have develop a new spoon which will help people that suffer with hand tremors have more control over their eating.Starting with a spoon, hopefully developing knife and fork attachments soon, the device is aimed to counteract movements of a...

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    Should GPs offer online consultations?

    Many people find it difficult to get time off work, travel and get in more harm when trying to get to the doctor's office for a consultation that lasts just ten minutes. Patients that have disabilities that can cause them pain when travelling for a long distance, or could catch different infections when sitting in waiting rooms could benefit from online consultations. Dr Mohammad Al-Ubaydli,...

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    Future of healthcare already here?

    The Guardian has reported that one lady, Marjorie Grey, is able to stay in her home in Killington and avoids going into hospital for treatment of her acute back pain as instead she receives regular visits from health professionals in her own home.This way of care has been set up by Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust in 2011 and has reduced unnecessary stays in hospital. Ms Grey is now...

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    A new app launches today to help with mental health

    Doc Ready is a digital tool that will allow young people to prepare as well as make the most out of mental health related visits they make to their GP's. This means that young people will know what to expect with the go to the GP for a consultation. This will be achieved through a plan, preparing them with what to say, and also record the outcomes of their appointments.Doc Ready is a development...

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    New technology being trialled to prevent blindness

    A new portable sight test kit called Peek has been designed in collaboration with scientists at the University of St Andrews, the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde. Peek works through a smartphone to perform eye tests and diagnose vision-related problems.In order to test how effective the tool is when compared to state-of-the-art hospital equipment it...

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    How Technology Can Improve Healthcare

     One of the biggest recent improvements has been the digitisation of patient records for the NHS, which has had a big impact on care quality. This is because it can speed up patient care and can enable staff to work more efficiently, as well as helping to solve the long lasting problem of data sharing between departments, which is always widely criticised for mistakes and problems that occur...

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    New Approach to Care with "Virtual Wards"

    A report has been released urging hospitals to use this new method of care to help with bed shortages and overcrowding in A&E units.It has already been used in some hospitals to help with growing demand and reduced NHS budgets, and means that patients who do not need to be kept in hospital can return home and be treated from there.As well as reducing the pressure on hospitals it also means...

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    txtm8 - 24/7 support via text for young people

    This is an area that is crucial to help young people, who are often hard to reach. The service will be available 24 hours a day and responses will be within 30 minutes of each enquiry, with specialist health workers replying to each text message.Providing crucial sex and relationship information to young people is always a challenge; and responding to enquiries 24 hours a day can be even more...

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    Integration by 2018 will Improve Care Standards

     Norman Lamb has said that full integration will see an end to uncoordinated services leading to patients being passed around the health and social care systems.The Department of Health (DoH) has said there will be a drop in the number of patients needlessly stuck in hospitals when health and social care are integrated in 2018.NHS England will have a budget of about £1bn to ensure there are...

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    Telecare Improves Lives in Pilot Project

    Telecare, including various specialist assisted living equipment, has been installed in the homes of as part of the NHS pilot project. They have reported significant improvement in the quality of their lives and capabilities using the new equipment.The Environmental Control System (ECS) can be controlled by touch, voice, different keys and switches to control the environment eg, electronic door...

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    Jeremy Hunt Announces Response to Francis Report

    Jeremy Hunt said that todays announcement was just the initial response, and is just the start of fundamental changes to the system. He wants to put quality of care at the heart of the NHS overhaul, instead of aiming for targets.Chairs of key organisations involved in care have pledged to implement the changes to make the NHS the best and safest health and care system in the world.The new...

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    Privatisation could be Dangerous for Healthcare

    The House of Lords will be debating new rules for the Health and Social Care Act for the role that private firms will have today.The changes are likely to give more power to individuals such as doctors, nurses and clinicians, but campaigners believe it should be MPs who make these decisions, not individuals.Prof Terence Stephenson has said in a letter to Lord Howe that he believes this move will...

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    Campaigners say £75,000 Cap will not solve the Care Crisis

    To fund this, the government will provide means-tested help with residential care costs for more people than previously which will cost £1bn a year.Health secretary Jeremy Hunt has said that the scheme will theoretically prevent people from having to sell their homes in order to pay for care, which would help to protect their inheritance.Under the plans, individuals assessed as having spent...

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    Welsh Govt give legal rights of support to Carers

    The Social Services Bill will widen the range of people and organisations delivering social services in order to give those in need of support greater choice and more control over the help they receive.Ministers say it will also give people a say over the care they receive and increased control over care budgets as social workers will have new powers to enter homes and speak to vulnerable...

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    Govt says Social Workers could be taken out of Adoption Process

    Local authority social workers could be stripped of their duties recruiting and assessing prospective adopters, if government threats are carried out in England.Under the proposal, announced today by the Department for Education (DfE), councils would be removed from the adoption screening process entirely. Local authority social workers would only be involved in the later stages of...

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    Telehealth will need more support from GPs to take off

    Long-term illnesses are one of the biggest costs to the NHS, and the 30% of patients with long-term illnesses account for around 70% of the NHS spending.Telehealth has been designed as a new way for these patients to monitor their own health at home, using new technology, and could save the NHS a lot of money. It is alike to telecare, which appears to be taking off in a big way across the...

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    Coalition to Set Care Cap at £75,000

    In their mid-term review at 2.30pm today, prime minister David Cameron and deputy Nick Clegg will announce a series of policy reforms, which should include supporting individuals with social care costs.Chancellor George Osborne has dismissed the proposal for the lower cap, as this is expected to increase the cost to the government up to £1.7bn per year. Instead this higher cap means it will cost...

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    Help get Healthwatch up and running

     The key functions of Healthwatch will be:The government has allocated funding for two years, and BVSC are hoping to get the organisation established by 1st April.BVSC are looking to hear your thoughts to ensure HealthWatch Birmingham becomes a strong and effective consumer champion and service deliver.They would like advice on:Please complete these questions here...

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    New protections for when care providers fail

    This highlights things like unsustainability or where quality of care is being compromised for financial gain.Following the consultation, Norman Lamb announced that the government will be introducing a regulation of major care providers, and if this is failed there will be plans for a well-managed exit.This is following a year of poor care cases in the media, such as the collapse of Southern...

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    Personal budgets target scrapped, and Deadline mentioned for Dilnot introduction

    He has stressed that this is just the first step and not the final figure, and he is still committed to personalisation of all health and social care services.The new target has been agreed as, following talks with the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services, the government has decided that not all service users would suit having personal budgetsThe latest figures show that 43% of...

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    Lamb calls for quick conclusion to social care funding

    At the Liberal Democrat conference yesterday, Lamb said that introducing the reform for social care funding could be a legacy for the government.The Dilnot proposal will allow the pooling of the risks of ‘catastrophic' care costs, as high as £100,000, that will hit one in ten people.He has insisted that the problem of funding needs to be resolved within months, and in particular with the...

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    Can Telecare help with the Social Care Reforms?

    The Government has published detailed plans of how it intends to reform adult social care. Although questions around funding remain unanswered, the reforms do present an opportunity to radically alter the way care services are delivered in England today.Traditional care delivery methods are no longer affordable or desirable. Whilst there will always be a need for more intensive care packages and...

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    Report on the most effective process for Personal Health Budgets

    The paper, by In Control in partnership with NHS North West, has been published to show the most effective processes for personal health budgets before they come in to effect in April 2014.Pilot sites have implemented the personal health budgets on a variety of services and support issues, such as mental health problems, diabetes, end of life care and continuing healthcare.Based on the research...

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    Department of Health give overview of the future Health and Care System

    This diagram gives an overview of the new health and care system from April 2013. It illustrates the statutory bodies that will make up the new system, oriented around people and communities and where they receive their local health and care services. The illustration of local health services is indicative of a range of familiar settings for health and care services and is not intended to be...

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    Do you have practice issues following the Care and Support White Paper?

    Launching Creating an Impact: Social Care Evidence in PracticeDo you have practice issues following the Care and Support White Paper? Do you have practice issues about long-term care/conditions?Professionals in the social care sector have been asked to help in a project that will draw together practice issues raised by practitioners together with research evidence. They will work closely with...

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    THERE IS AN INCREASE IN THE NUMBER OF PATIENTS WHO WAIT LONG HOURS IN AMBULANCES BEFORE BEING ATTENDED TO

    Reports by The Guardian shows details from the FOI requests which found that:According to the shadow health secretary, Jon Ashworth:"These figures show an ambulance service pushed to the brink by years of Tory underinvestment. It's clear that NHS services last year were operating at the absolute limit of what they could with."There is no excuse for the government to allow another crisis on this...

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    DATA REVEALS THAT OVER 40% OF MATERNITY WARDS IN ENGLAND REJECTED EXPECTANT MOTHERS AT LEAST ONCE LAST YEAR

    The data which was the outcome of a Freedom of Information request reveals the following:Jonathan Ashworth, the Shadow health secretary, said:"These findings show the devastating impact which Tory underfunding is having for mothers and children across the country."The uncertainty for so many women just when they need the NHS most is unthinkable."A Department of Health spokesperson also said that...

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    PARENTS AND CHILDCARE PROVIDERS ARE FINDING IT DIFFICULT TO ACCESS SERVICES ON THE "CHILDCARE CHOICES" WEBSITE

    Many parents have reported problems while using the Childcare Choices website in May and struggled to register on it. However, HMRC apologised for the inconvenience, saying it had improved the website.Two government-funded childcare schemes are to be accessed on the website, namely:According to an HMRC spokesman:"We know that some parents and childcare providers have experienced difficulties...

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    HOSPITAL BUILDING PLANS TO CLOSE FOR A YEAR DUE TO FIRE SAFETY PROBLEMS

    After a review of buildings, 52 inpatient beds will be moved from the trauma unit of John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, on the 4th of August.According to the NHS trust overseeing the site, a "combination of fire safety factors with this building" makes it presently unfit for inpatients. Oxford University Hospitals (OUH) NHS Foundation Trust report identified the following:OUH Chief Executive, Dr...

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    THERE IS INSUFFICIENT CARE AVAILABLE FOR CHILDREN WITH SERIOUS MENTAL HEALTH PROBLEMS

    New figures on mental health showed the following:The author of an EPI report on children's mental health, Emily Frith, said:"Being in hospital for a mental health condition can be a disturbing experience for a young person. for example, there is a risk that they will witness frightening incidents such as another patient's self-harm or that their condition gets worse due to being separated from...

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    REPORT WARNS THAT VULNERABLE ADULTS ARE BEING LET DOWN BY SOCIAL WORKERS AND CARE PROVIDERS

    According to the Local Government and Social Care Ombudsman review:Local government and social care ombudsman, Michael King, said:"While I appreciate the complex emotional and practical decisions social workers need to make, the people they look after are still entitled to be treated fairly, and have their assessments undertaken correctly and in a timely."What do you think?Please tweet comments...

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    ONE OF SCOTLAND'S LARGEST HEALTH BOARDS HAS OVERSPENT ON CARE SERVICES

    Prior to a meeting of the Edinburgh Integration Joint Board (IJB) today, the following figures emerged:The entire NHS Lothian budget shows a funding gap of £22.4m and the IJB agreed to savings of £6.5m over the year on health and social care.Moria Pringle, NHS Lothian's interim chief finance officer's paper, said this in her paper:"The emerging financial position for both NHS and council...

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    SURVEY FINDS THAT MENTAL HEALTH DEMANDS ARE EXPECTED TO INCREASE THIS YEAR

    The poll by NHS Providers suggests the following:Louise Rubin of the charity, Mind, said:"We are concerned that people coming forward and seeking help for mental health problems are not getting the support they need early enough, which means they are more likely to become more unwell and reach crisis point."A Department of Health spokeswoman also said:"We're committed to seeing mental health...

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    ADASS ISSUES GUIDANCE FOR SOCIAL WORKERS ON HOW TO PROTECT VULNERABLE ADULTS FROM SCAMS

    The guidance by the ADASS includes the following:Vice President of ADASS, Glen Garrod, said:"Carers, families and neighbours need to be more aware of abuse, which can see older and disabled people lose their life savings and suffer deteriorating health after falling victim to scam letters, calls or doorstep fraudsters."The guidance we have published in tandem with partners on financial abuse...

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    THE WELSH GOVERNMENT PAYS BACK TO FAMILIES WHO WRONGLY PAID CARE HOME FEES

    A Welsh Government spokesman said:"Earlier this year we introduced an amended process in order to accelerate the speed at which claims are processed."We have also developed common reporting criteria across all health boards to ensure the progress in processing claims, and problems or challenges, are captured and managed as early as possible."What do you think?Please tweet comments...

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    A SYSTEM WHEREBY PEOPLE CAN GET MORE INFORMED ABOUT ROUGH SLEEPING IS BEING MOBILISED

    The system which was launched by Rough Sleepers Cymru, a coalition of homelessness charities has had a successful year with more than 795 referrals since it was launched.According to Anthony Kandall, chair of Rough Sleepers, Cymru:"Streelink helps people make a real difference."Often, we can feel helpless seeing the increase in rough sleeping. By contacting Streetlink, the public knows that...

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    THE INCREASING FUNDING GAP FOR VULNERABLE CHILDREN IN ENGLAND REQUIRES RECTIFICATION

    The Local Government Association said the following:According to a spokeswoman for the Department of Education;"We want every single child, no matter where they live, to receive the same high-quality care and support - and this is exactly what our reforms are set up to deliver."We are clear that providing help as early as possible is the most effective way of keeping children safe, and our new...

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    FIGURES SHOW THAT CARE HOMES HAVE SUFFERED FROM RISING INSOLVENCIES OVER THE LAST SEVEN YEARS

    New government figures show that 75 care home businesses covering nursing homes, homes for the elderly, residential care activities for learning disabilities, mental health, and substance abuse were declared insolvent in 2016, up from 74 the previous year, The Guardian reports.The chief executive of Care England,  Martin Green, said:"My view is that if you ask me who is to blame, it is the...

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    MINISTERS PLAN TO PUT NHS PROFESSIONALS IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS ON A FULL-TERM BASIS

    While being interviewed by The Telegraph, Prince Harry revealed that he had sought counselling to help him come to terms with the death of his mother, Diana, Princess of Wales, as he struggled for a couple of years in his late twenties to deal with losing her. Other public figures and politicians have also begun to reveal their experiences with mental health. One Labour MP described his...

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    IS THE QUALITY OF ADULT SOCIAL CARE DETERIORATING?

    The BBC analysed data collated by the charity "Skills for Care" and revealed that:25 year old, Trudi Hewitt, who works at a care home in Scarborough, North Yorkshire, said:"This is not the job I'm going to be doing for the rest of my career."I really care about the people I look after, but I just feel that the care sector is a dead end job."It's upsetting and disheartening when you find out that...

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    DATA REVEALS THAT MANY PRACTICES CLOSED LAST YEAR FORCING THOUSANDS OF PATIENTS TO FIND A NEW SURGERY

    Despite the government's attempts to stop local doctors from shutting their doors, the NHS data showed the following:According to the GP website, Pulse, family doctors are unable to cope with increased demand and need immediate funds to survive.Although last year the NHS announced its forward view plan to invest £2.4bn into services by 2020 and the government announced a £500m investment with...

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    NEWLY PUBLISHED FIGURES ANALYSE SOCIAL CARE SPENDING

    The new report by researchers at the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), funded by the Health Foundation made the following findings:The author of the report and research economist at the IFS, Polly Simpson, said:"The spending cuts analysed in our report have been accompanied by a substantial fall in the number of people receiving social care: down 25% across England, between 2009-10 and 2013-14...

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    REPORT FINDS THAT THERE IS AN INCREASE IN HEART DISEASES WHICH COSTS THE NHS ABOUT 1.2 BILLION POUNDS YEARLY

    Report by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) finds that over 20 million people in the UK are physically inactive and this increases the risk of heart disease which costs the NHS about £1.2 billion yearly.According to the report, "inactive" is defined as not achieving the government guidelines for physical activity of 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity a week and strength...

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    REPORT FINDS THAT LACK OF SUFFICIENT MENTAL HEALTH PROVISION IS THE CAUSE OF THE RISE IN SUICIDES AMONG FEMALE PRISONERS

    A Prison and Probation Ombudsman, Nigel Newcomen, drew up a bulletin which reviewed 19 cases of female suicides over the last three years; the following were found:According to the Ministry of Justice data, there are 3,869 female prisoners compared to 80,988 in the male estate which represents 5% of the whole prison population. However, women account for 23% of all incidents of self-harm.Mr....

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    HUNDREDS OF PREGNANT WOMEN WITHOUT LEGAL STATUS ARE AVOIDING SEEKING NHS ANTENATAL CARE

    One NHS trust has contravened its guidelines on maternity care by sending letters to women with complex asylum claims, warning that they will have their antenatal care cancelled if they do not bring credit cards to pay fees of over £5,000 for maternity care.According to NHS rules, it is legal to ask for payment from those who are not eligible for free care because they are not domiciled in the...

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    DATA SHOWS THAT MORE THAN 23,000 ALLEGATIONS HAVE BEEN MADE AGAINST CARERS

    The requests submitted by the BBC Radio 4 programme File on 4 showed the following data:A Department of Health Official said:"This government has introduced tougher inspections of care services, given councils access to up to £7.6bn of dedicated funding for social care and will continue to challenge local authorities that do not fulfil their duties under the Care Act".What do you think?Please...

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    ONE OF THE BIGGEST LOSSES OF SENSITIVE CLINICAL INFORMATION IN THE NHS's 69-YEAR HISTORY

    Documents containing patient data ranging from screening results to blood tests and diagnosis did not reach their intended recipients for more than five years, from 2011 to 2016, as the company which was supposed to deliver - a private company co-owned by the Department of Health and the French firm Sopra Steria - mistakenly stored them in a warehouse.An inquiry which costs millions of pounds has...

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    NEW RESEARCH FINDS THAT ALMOST ONE IN FOUR FEMALE SLEEPERS HAS SUFFERED SEXUAL ASSAULT IN THE PAST YEAR

    New research from national charity for homeless people, "Crisis" finds that almost one in four female sleepers has suffered sexual assault in the past year.The report which made findings from a survey of 458 recent or current rough sleepers in England and Wales and a total of 72 women in all, showed that almost 6 in 10 women have been intimidated or threatened with violence in the past year; a...

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    REPORT FINDS THAT "CHILD HEALTH IN THE UK IS LAGGING BEHIND THAT OF MOST OTHER EUROPEAN COUNTRIES"

    This report, according to the BBC: Here are some of its statistical findings:These statistics are higher in the UK than in most European countries.According to Prof. Russell Viner, from the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health:"The UK is more unequal than many other European countries, and children aren't a priority."We have some fantastic healthcare in certain institutions in this...

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    IF NHS CUTS COST OF EXPENSIVE TREATMENTS, IT MAY BE DETRIMENTAL TO PATIENTS

    NHS England and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, who recommend the drugs the NHS uses to curb growing bills, have put plans to cut expensive bills forward.However, patients group and the drug industry have already disapproved the plans and for more than three months, a consultation has been run.Sir Andrew Dillion, chief executive of NICE said:"The pace and scale of...

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    NHS LEADERSHIP HAS TRIED TO KEEP SECRET PLANS TO CUT HOSPITAL SERVICES

    According to the King's Fund, NHS England told local managers to keep the plans "out of the public domain" and avoid requests for information.Forty-four reviews of local services have been set up across the country and interviews were carried out by King's Fund with staff involved in four reviews known as Sustainability and Transformation Plans (STPs). Proposals have also been drawn:Interviews...

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    SURVEY RESULT SHOWS THAT THE SOCIAL CARE CRISIS IS GETTING WORSE

    Here are findings of the survey:According to the former president of ADASS (Association of Directors of Adult Social Services), Ray James, social care is approaching a 'perfect storm' and vulnerable people may keep getting insufficient help, therefore, the government needs to fund this sector as quickly as possible in order for help to be rendered.He said:"This survey paints a picture of adult...

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    LONDON COUNCILS REQUIRE HELP TO CARE FOR REFUGEE CHILDREN

    The councils need more financial help so they can help to support the refugee children over the next few years, since they "have had their budgets cut by over two-thirds since 2010", according to the Guardian.Toufique Houssain of Duncan Lewis solicitors was concerned to hear reports from some children, he said:"We have been receiving texts from some of the children saying that bandits are...

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    HELP NEEDED FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE WITH MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES

    On the 21st of October, Jeremy Hunt, the Secretary of State for Health, said:"Mental health services for young are biggest NHS failing."Mr. Hunt has also advised that schools should work more closely with Child and adolescent mental health services (Camhs) teams and there should be more counselors on school premises.A secondary schools counselor for 14 years, Catrina Goundry, expressed her...

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    CHIEF EXECUTIVE ENVISAGES FINANCIAL PRESSURES DUE TO GROWING DEMAND FROM AGEING POPULATION

    The chief executive of the health service, Simon Stevens, said this to the MPs:"For the next three years, we didn't get the funding that was requested ... so, as a result, we've got a bigger hill to climb."Given we've got an ageing and growing population if you just look at the population growth - even before you take account of ageing - 2018/19 will be the most pressurised year for us - where...

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    THE ADULT SOCIAL CARE SYSTEM REQUIRES IMPROVEMENTS

    According to the watchdog in its annual assessment of care in England:ITV News reported what CQC executive, David Behan, said:"What's happening, we think, is that where people aren't getting access to care, and we are not preventing people's needs developing through adult social care, is that they are presenting at A&E."Emergency admissions of older people are increasing and we also know that...

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    THE NEED TO EVALUATE FINANCIAL SAVINGS ON SOCIAL CARE DELIVERY IN SCOTLAND

    However, with some £569m of that money outsourced to the third sector, without a major change, spending will increase to about £667m a year by 2020.According to  Audit Scotland's research, people did not feel like  they could speak up about the services they received "in case the care they received was reduced or changed" or to protect the "feelings of the people providing care".Third Force...

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    RATINGS SHOW THAT MANY CCGs IN ENGLAND PROVIDE INADEQUATE CARE TO CANCER PATIENTS

    In some areas, only one in three cancer patients get diagnosed early, which is half the figure for the best performing area; almost half of the patients in one area do not get their first treatments in a timely manner and in other areas, thousands die early due to poor NHS care.According to the executive director of policy and impact at Macmillian Cancer Support, Dr. Fran Woodard:"The fact that...

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    MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES MAY BECOME UNDERFUNDED DUE TO BUDGET PRESSURES

    The PAC report says:"How the improvements in services will be paid for is less clear..."The Department has announced an additional £1billion for mental health services over the next 5 years, but this money is not ring-fenced."Although the Department for health said the extra money for the service would help over a million extra people access care by 2020, chair of the PAC, Meg Hiller MP said...

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    OVER 70 SEX ATTACKS IN CARE HOMES REPORTED

    Most of these homes cater to the elderly, aged 65 and older and most of the crimes reported were physical sex assaults, including several alleged rapes.These were the findings after the BBC submitted Freedom of Information Act (FOI) request to all police forces of which 80% replied:What do you think?Please tweet comments @suppsolutions...

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    A NEED FOR REFORM IN THE SOCIAL CARE SYSTEM

    According to the report:After carrying out interviews with people working in the service and being cared for, as well as analysing existing data during their review, Think tank found:BBC News reports that:"A £5bn pot of money has been set aside to encourage joint work between the NHS and care sector, with an additional £1.5bn  being added to that by 2019, and councils have been allowed to...

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    CUTS APPROVED FOR LANCASHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL

    Lancashire County Council (LCC) have signed off on the revised proposals at their budget meeting, where they had to try and find nearly £200 million to save by 2020. This means that the local authorities will sell more than 100 buildings including libraries, children's services and youth centres.However, LCC altered their original proposals after consulting with the public on the changes.David...

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    MANY YOUNG OFFENDERS ARE PLACED IN UNSUITABLE ACCOMMODATION- ACCORDING TO REPORT

    The report which examined cases of 16 and 17-year-olds who have previously had traumatic experiences, hence "difficult behaviour" gave the following findings:The BBC reports what a government spokesperson said:"The law is clear that children's services must protect any child without a home and give them the support they need - and this age group is no exception."The number of 16 and 17-year-olds...

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    THE NHS AND MENTAL HEALTH

    According to a report by The Mental Health Foundation (MHF, Fundamental Facts About Mental Health, 2015): "Only 5.5% of UK health research spending goes to mental health study. With one in four adults suffering a mental health issue, there is an obvious imbalance."The UK is in a mental health crisis and millions of people across the country suffer in some way with mental health issues, in the...

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    STANDARDS IN ELDERLY CARE COULD FALL WITH THE NEW NATIONAL LIVING WAGE

    Study by think tank has warned that "Standards in elderly care could fall following the introduction of the National Living Wage for care workers unless the government is able to help plug the shortfall in funding".The study also found "no evidence of employers cutting back on shifts to finance the new wage rise and warned local authorities could use the excuse of higher wages to 'ration' care...

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    UNISON TELLS GOVERNMENT INQUIRY THAT SOCIAL CARE FUNDING WOULD BECOME WORSE

    UNISON also pointed out that:An inquiry has been launched by the Communities and Local Government Committee, to look into whether the funding available for adult social care is enough for local authorities to fulfill their statutory obligations, to assess and meet the needs of people requiring care and support.Clive Betts MP, committee chair, while commenting on the inquiry at its launch in June,...

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    YOUNG PEOPLE'S MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES AND SHORTAGE OF BEDS

    Samantha and Jonathan Lethbridge who are struggling to find mental health care for their 10-year-old daughter have expressed their worry.Mr Lethbridge said:"Our daughter needs urgent medical support and there is nothing available."If our daughter was admitted to hospital with an open broken leg, they'd rush her to surgery."This is far worse. Her life is at risk. And we are being told there is...

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    COUNCILS, CARE PROVISION AND THE ALLOCATION OF RESPITE CARE

    To make budgetary savings, Knowsley council offered four weeks as the maximum annual amount of respite they could offer.However, the Local Government Ombudsman warned that councils must ensure care provision is determined by an individual assessment of need, even in times of financial pressure, and told the council to review the process for allocating respite care.According to the Ombudsman's...

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    SOCIAL-CARE CRISIS IN BRITAIN

    The Brtish Red Cross's charity executive director for independent living and crisis response, said:"The British Red Cross has long asserted that we face a social-care crisis in the country."... I know that across Britain, we find patients who are ready to leave hospital but can't; patients who are sent home before they are ready, with no support; and people who need some help at home but cannot...

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    SOME PATIENTS COULD BE REMOVED FROM THEIR GP LIST

    GP leaders have however asked for this initiative to be "scrapped and warned that it will lead to patients being excluded for no good reason and deprive surgeries of money they need to keep running", the Guardian reports.Chair of the contracts and regulations subcommittee of the British Medical Association's GP committee, Dr Robert Morley, said:"Patients have a right to be registered unless they...

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    FINANCIAL CRISIS WITHIN THE NHS

    Official NHS figures also show that trusts in England were loaned £530m for building projects and for new equipment such as scanners, bringing the total amount of funding provided during the year to £3.36bn.Research by the House of Commons library done on behalf of Norman Lamb, the Liberal Democrat Health Spokesman and backed by NHS finance experts claim that the "astronomical £2.825bn showed...

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    RISE IN COUNCIL TAX AND 'CARE CUTS'

    Directors in charge of care for older people and adults with disabilities pointed out the following in the annual survey:These could lead to the following, according to the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (ADASS):ADASS president Harold Bodmer said: "We have been arguing for some time that adult social care needs to be given the same protection and investment as the NHS....

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    NHS BUDGET AND STAFF CUTS

    BBC health editor Hugh Pym said "This is an important week for the financing of the health service in England" as the NHS leadership is set to unveil plans to get hospitals and other trusts to stick to agreed spending limits.The King's Fund warns that "If the government wants to balance the health service books, then staffing levels will have to be reduced and waiting times targets relaxed, so...

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    MENTAL HEALTH SUPPORT FOR CHILDREN

    School nurses in Walsall run courses to help both primary and secondary students overcome anxiety, low self-esteem and lack of confidence.Cllr Izzi Seccombe, the portfolio holder for community wellbeing at the LGA, which represents 370 councils, said:"What is deeply concerning is that there are substantial numbers of children and young people who are increasingly struggling with mental health...

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    WOULD CARE QUALITY DETERIORATE?

    Survey by the Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA) also shows the following:Paul Briddock, the director of policy at the HFMA, said:"Fears around the impact the current financial turmoil in the NHS could have on quality are a real cause for concern and we may start to see more of these predictions come through in the year ahead." According to the HFMA's latest biannual "NHS...

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    AUTISM TRAINING FOR NHS STAFF

    The Westminster commission on autism called on the health secretary, Jeremy Hunt, to remind clinical commissioning groups of the obligations to ensure staff have the skills to support autistic people, reports the Guardian. Barry Sheerman, the MP for Huddersfield, founder of the inquiry who has a grandson with autism said:"Our health professionals are committed and well-intentioned. However,...

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    THE EFFECT OF NEW JOB TITLES ON HEALTH AND CARE INTEGRATION

    The supporting integration through new roles and working across boundaries review found the following:Helen Gilburt, Lead author and King's Fund fellow said:"Our analysis found new roles are not always the most effective way of delivering integrated care- and can, in fact, lead to solutions which are unsustainable."...while the aim of creating a more flexible and multi-skilled workforce to...

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    KEY CONCERNS WITHIN THE CHILDREN CARE SYSTEM IN WALES

    The Children's commissioner's report further highlighted the following issues according to ITV News:Sally Holland said:"It has been enlightening to hear young people's experiences through our fieldwork, including young people who have been able to make positive changes to their lives as a result of good support from staff in children's homes."...I encourage all those who work with children in...

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    BREXIT AND HEALTHCARE

    The campaign claimed that membership in the EU cost the UK £350 million a week, "enough to build a brand new, fully staffed ... hospital every week", reports CNNMoney.Pro-Brexit politicians continued to make the claim, despite been repeatedly admonished by the Independent Statistics Watchdog, for misleading voters. The slogan was also painted on the side of the campaign's bus. According to...

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    BIRMINGHAM CITY COUNCIL TO BUY EMPTY HOUSES

    The Birmingham city council is seeking to provide much-needed housing and to remove the negative impact empty houses are having on the local communities and neighbourhoods.The cabinet member for housing and homes, Cllr Peter Griffiths said:"In the last three years, we have brought around 1,000 empty properties back into use."We offer homeowners advice, guidance and support in bringing their...

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    HOSPITAL INCIDENTS IN ENGLAND

    The RCN which is holding its annual congress in Glasgow said that across England, "the hospital sector is feeling the strain of financial pressures and increased demand", reports the Guardian. According to them, the following are some issues facing local hospitals in England:Janet Davies, the RCN's Chief executive and general secretary said:"Having once been the preserve of the worst weeks of...

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    PRECAUTIONARY CARE FOR PREGNANT WOMEN WITH EPILEPSY

    "Between 2009 and 2013, 21 women died during pregnancy as a result of epilepsy and in most of those cases, their seizures were found to be poorly controlled."Experts also say, "the risk of death is ten times greater in pregnant women with epilepsy than those without the condition."Nevertheless, "around 2,500 infants are estimated to be born to women with epilepsy every year in the UK", reports...

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    CHILDREN'S SOCIAL CARE AT RISK

    "Under "Power to test different ways of working", Clauses 15 to 19 of the children and social work bill introduce a fast-track process for the removal of any hundreds of local authority duties to children, young people and families."After a request from a local authority or a specified person sent by ministers into a local area to oversee the improvement of children's services, regulations can...

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    INCREASED USE OF LOCUM GP'S IN ENGLAND "LINKED TO DEPRIVATION"

    BBC News also found after analysing data that in some parts of England, "18% of the GP workforce was made of locums (doctors that stand for and/or temporarily cover a vacancy for an absent doctor) compared to a national average of 3.4%.The data above which was initially collected by the Health and Social Care Information Centre shows the following:According to the clinical chair of NHS Bradford...

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    HOUSING ASSOCIATIONS AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE DETECTION

    Ms Theresa May, the Home secretary told the Police Federation Annual Conference that domestic violence victims:"...were being let down by the police.""Victims of abuse are still being let down, and reports are not being taken seriously enough." and"The right skills, training and commitment to protect the vulnerable are still not held by every single police officer." Sky News reports.Gudrun...

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    INSUFFICIENT HELP FOR VULNERABLE WOMEN

    According to a survey by Women's Aid,The figures above are a fraction of how prevalent these issues are among vulnerable women, which has made some of them evade support.Women with very complex needs and experiences of violence are usually in very traumatising situations which requires utmost care and attention.These women, therefore, turn to drugs and alcohol in order to cope with their...

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    SOLUTION TO NHS 'BED BLOCKING' CRISIS

    In February, Lord Carter's review of English Acute Hospitals revealed that "8,500 hospital beds were taken each year by medically fit patients". Care Industry News, reports.This, in turn, affects the whole NHS regarding admissions and elective procedure rates: Bed-blocking or delayed transfer of care is drastically affecting some aspects of hospital care, According to a report by the...

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    13% OF CHILDREN WITH LIFE-THREATENING CONDITIONS DENIED SPECIALIST SUPPORT

    Anne Longfield said the system was "playing Russian roulette" with children's health, BBC reports.NHS England said it was "clearly the case" that services need to expand.According to a report, as mentioned by the BBC, "Those who secured treatment faced lengthy delays with an average waiting time of more than 100 days.""More than a quarter of children referred to mental health services in...

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    Homeless people being turned away from shelters

    According to a government report, an average of 100 people a day are being turned away from Victorian homelessness agencies, The Guardian reports.Around 92 people per day, who needed accommodation and support, have been rejected of these services in the past financial year.  This report suggests that these agencies are having to deal with high numbers of people in need of shelters - but lack of...

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    App for people with mental health concerns

    The Students' Centre of Health, WELLWVU (based at the West Virginia University, USA) created the app in order for students to receive direct mental healthcare.Data about mood, anxiety and sleeping habits can be displayed on a graph and accessible from the app so users can get a better understanding of their habits and how they can improve. It also encourages users to engage in ‘wellness...

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    Award-winning suicide prevention app helps people to deal with their mental health issues

    A team led by Nadine Kaslow, an Emory University School of Medicine psychologist, have developed the user-friendly mobile app. It was ultimately designed to provide support on daily basis for people with mental health issues and then continuous and follow-up checks for people at risk of suicide.ReliefLink helps the user monitor their thoughts and moods, and helps them to develop coping skills for...

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    Homelessness hostel uses psychologists to treat residents in need

    It has resulted in a noticeable reduction of the residents' criminal activity and has improved their general health and well-being, The Independent reports.This unique project houses former rough sleepers ranging from drug addicts, alcoholics, prostitutes - many of whom were deemed as ‘too challenging' to help.Clinical Psychologist from the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust (SLaM)...

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    The use of mobile apps for mental health care

    According to the Wall Street Journal, developers are creating smartphone applications which some health care providers have encouraged the use of, to treat and monitor patients' mental health conditions.  An app created by Ginger.io has been recommended by gynaecologists for patients who have come close to the end of their pregnancies. This app can help to track:·         How far the...

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    ‘Overlap’ between homelessness, criminal convictions and substance misuse

    It was found that 58,000 people per year have access to institutions which deal with all three, Inside Housing reports. Researchers at Heriot-Watt University gathered data from criminal justice, substance misuse and homelessness services. They wanted to see to how each system dealt with people from each of these three categories.  The report stated that those who are in aid of homelessness...

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    New technology helps older people and people with disabilities

    The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) is trialling new technology to support older people and people with disabilities in their homes in Australia, ABC reports.The technology is a sensor network which can be installed in a client's home and can monitor environment factors like heat and movement. It uses a network of home sensors to track a person's movements,...

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    Study shows targeted programmes help reduce domestic violence

    The research showed that the majority of men changed their behaviour after going on a course, Chronicle Live reports.Consequently, Durham University's Professor Nicole Westmarland is calling for more funding for domestic violence perpetrator programmes (DVPPs) to help to reduce widespread domestic violence that leaves a serious damage on families, women and their children.The results of the study...

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    Mental health amongst young people

    The survey was carried out by the CentreForum thinktank's mental health commission. It found that headteachers at more than half of the schools in England believe that the referral system for sending pupils to child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) is not working, the Guardian reports. Chair of the Commission, Paul Burstow MP stated, "The results of this survey suggest schools and...

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    New update for Google Translate app

    The app will enable automatic, real-time translation of voice to text for some languages, Mashable reports.Currently, the app can translate text-to-text between 80 languages and also provides voice to text translation but requires you to manually choose the desired language that you want a translation in.However, after the update, the app will automatically recognise when someone is speaking in...

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    Specialist team help to tackle substance misuse in York

    At York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust a specialist team including nurses help patients who have serious problems with alcohol and substance misuse, York Press reports.The Alcohol Concern campaign encourages people to refrain from drinking alcohol and have an enjoyable break for a month after the excesses of the holiday season.However, for some people, drinking and substance misuse has...

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    New app helps healthcare professionals identify mental health issues

    This is an underdiagnosed condition affecting women after they give birth.The usage of the app by 200 women has been tracked, and it was found that behavioural patterns and symptoms tied to depression, NewsMax Health reports. For example, there was a link found between poor mood and decreased mobility on weekends and longer duration phone calls.The Ginger.io app is a new health technology that...

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    Firm’s work with disabled workers saves UK taxpayers millions

    Remploy's recent figures show that it found more than 18,500 jobs for people with disabilities or health conditions in 2014. It claims that for every £1 it gave in supporting disabled and disadvantaged people, it delivered £2.51 in social value. 24dash reports. In July, the Department for Work and Pensions launched a commercial process under which Remploy Employment Services would leave...

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    Ginsberg Health App

    The Ginsberg health app is aimed at physical and mental well-being and has received Scottish Government backing. Ginsberg has already attracted more than 1,000 users in Scotland and elsewhere in the UK. It is also targeting a health app market which is more aimed at physical health which the firm's founders consider a major opportunity, Scotsman reports. Approximately, one in four British...

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    Torbay Council: Judge ruled that care homes were underpaid

    A council is facing a bill after a court ruled that it underpaid private care homes for placements. Almost 30 care homes claimed that Torbay Council was paying them up to £70 less per person per week in comparison to neighbouring Devon Country Council. BBC reports. The Torbay Quality Care Forum (TQCF) said paying too little could create problems with staffing and maintenance.Accountants who...

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    Overwhelming numbers of young homeless people

    The study, conducted by Cardiff University for homelessness charity Crisis, is the first ever profile of single homeless people across England, Scotland and Wales. It shows the reasons why people first became homeless, and the lack of help received by these homeless people means that the majority have recurring experiences of homelessness as they just do not get the help they need. 24dash...

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    Project in Coventry develops new app for people with disabilities

    Coventry University's Serious Games Institute (SGI) is leading the project along with disabled employment services provider Remploy, digital developers Serious Games International and Hereward College, to develop the new ‘Work Buddy' app.A grant of £99,000 has been given to the project as part of the second phase of the Small Business Research Initiative (SBRI), which is sponsored by the...

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    Study shows how social media can prevent decline in older people’s health

    According to the research, older people who spend time online do not feel as lonely as others their age, which could slow down the deterioration of physical and mental health. Reports Exeter Express and Echo.This two-year project conducted by the University of Exeter in partnership with Somerset Care Ltd and Torbay & Southern Devon Health and Care NHS Trust involved a group of 76 old people...

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    Homeless at risk this winter due to lack of emergency accommodation

    An Inside Housing survey of 138 council staff, taken from 115 councils across England has revealed that 49 of them stated that their employer has reduced its facilities in providing emergency accommodation if temperatures drop below zero degrees, is already the case in some parts of England. They suggest that councils may breach their own Severe Weather Emergency Protocols (SWEP) which are...

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    Smartphones for people with limited mobility

    We cannot forget the people around us who are simply unable to use them. Sesame is the first smartphone that works for people with disabilities out of the box, originating from Israel.For people without the use of their hands and limited dexterity, it is impossible to navigate themselves on a smartphone. However, the Sesame phone enables these people to receive a Google Nexus 5 that's preloaded...

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    Panic button app for young people suffering with their mental health

     It may be difficult for a teenager to express their emotions and find it difficult to explain why they are feeling that way to those around them. However, Code Blue serves a much easier way to share their feelings or get help from their family or friends by a quick and simple press of a button.There are 350 million people living with depression; many of whom are teenagers and young people...

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    Text messages used to remind people to take medication

    A text messaging service could aid people in remembering to take their prescribed medicines.The NHS spends more than £500m on wasted medicines and avoidable illness, estimations have shown.Study leader Prof David Wald explained that text reminders could be used by GPs, hospital doctors and pharmacists for a range of different conditions, including diabetes, TB and HIV. He also added that the...

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    The hidden homelessness of the UK: Sofa Surfing

    According to the ComRes poll for youth homelessness charity Centrepoint, family relationship breakdown was found to be a major cause of 'sofa-surfing' as 20% of those who had to live on floors and sofas in the last year stated it was because their parents were unable or unwilling to provide them with accommodation.  The poll of 2,000 young people aged 16-25 found that one in five (21%) of those...

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    London's improvements to mental health crisis care

    Representatives from 22 organisations, including the NHS, Metropolitan Police, social care, housing and local councils will join forces to ensure this goal is achieved.The care that can be provided to individuals is variable and they have the option to choose any one of the 14 places for help; accident and emergency, the transport police, homecare, or a police cell for mental health...

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    The Patient Council ask for GPs to extend opening hours

    Chief Executive Maeve Hully also expressed her concern that there are "strong arguments for concern about people's experiences in the process of accessing care".She added that while "most people could access their GP within a reasonably acceptable time," availability of appointments could be improved.She said: "Those who experience difficulty may delay seeking and obtaining treatment, underuse...

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    NHS Now Controls Lister Surgicentre In Stevenage

    The Department of Health bought it for £53m and it will be called the Treatment Center.Services there have been transferred to East and North Hertfordshire NHS Trust.It used to provide routine surgery in areas such as ear, nose and throat, trauma, orthopaedics, gynaecology and ophthalmology for NHS patients referred there.In April last year, Care Quality Commission (CQC) inspectors failed...

Exempt Accommodation, Welfare Reform and Vulnerable Tenants Another excellent session from Support Solutions - excellent value for money and excellent training D.A - St Vincent's Housing Association

 

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