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    In the Supreme Court earlier this week, it was argued that the ‘Pereira test’ used to assess the vulnerability of homeless people is ‘absurdly harsh’.

    This test judges vulnerability by comparing a homeless person with an ‘ordinary homeless person’.

    This has been one of the most important cases for homelessness law in recent years. Charities Crisis and Shelter disputed with the government over what it meant for a homeless person to be ‘vulnerable’ and how desperate they would need to be in order for housing decisions to be made. Inside Housing reports. 

    They argued this definition understood by councils meant that decisions were being made on available resources instead of need. A judgement is expected to be passed in the New Year.

    Chief Executive of Crisis, Jon Sparkes argued in his statement to the court this week that this test ‘has the perverse effect of setting the bar of vulnerability at the level of those who have suffered most.’

    Chief Executive of Shelter, Campbell Robb mentioned in this statement to the court that a north/south divide has been created in relation to housing decisions and the judgement of the vulnerability of homeless people. 

    What do you think of this? Tweet us your comments @suppsolutions

     

    December 19, 2014 by Shumila Begum Categories: Housing And Benefits

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