Strategic advice & funding for housing, care & support providers

Contact us now to discuss your requirements

    People affected by the bedroom tax have reported experiencing stress, anxiety, hunger, ill-health and depression.

    A study published in the Journal of Public Health has found that worries around debt, rent and arrears and the prospect of being moved from their family home has produces a sense of “hopelessness verging on desperation”.  Tenants reported being trapped in a “vicious cycle” of loneliness and isolation, reports the Guardian. 

    The study has concluded that the bedroom tax has “increased poverty and had broad-ranging adverse effects on health, wellbeing and social relationships”, despite the government’s assertion that the policy would have no negative impact on health and wellbeing.

    The study, by University of Newcastle academics and local public health officials, interviewed 38 social housing tenants and 12 local housing agencies, public services and charities. It states: “Worries about potential re-location, not being able to provide healthy food for themselves or their children, living in inadequately heated homes and spiralling rent arrears contributed to mental health problems. All participants reported feelings of stress, many recounted symptoms of anxiety and depression, and service providers observed that these were widespread throughout the community.”

    What do you think of this? Tweet us your comments @suppsolutions

    March 16, 2015 by Laura Matthews Categories: Government And Reforms

    Latest Briefing

    Introduction The National Statement of Expectations for Supported Housing (NSE) was finally published on 20 October 2020, five years after the 2015 Comprehensive Spending Review suggested regulatory and oversight changes were needed, although in 2018 the government >>>

     

    Customer endorsement

    Responding to the DWP Consultation:  Housing Benefit Reform - Supported Housing

    "It was well-run, in a good location, and very useful.  I've only one suggestion; as the session went on it would perhaps have been useful for bullet points of general agreement about what should be in the sector response to be displayed and added to as the session went on, maybe on a flip chart. Regarding your response paper, I particularly like the answer you give to question 9.  In fact the general: "if it ain't broke don't fix it" response could be pushed harder."

    M.P. - Adref Ltd

    Quick Contact