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    It is believed that housing benefit could be cut by over 10% in George Osborne’s July Budget as the government attempts to deliver its commitment to reduce welfare spending. welfare bill 2.jpg

    The Institute for Fiscal Studies has said that in order to protect child benefits housing benefits, tax credits and disability benefits would “most likely” take the biggest hit, reports 24dash.

    Carl Emmerson, IFS deputy director, explained: “One area where the Conservatives’ manifesto commits to make cuts is in social security spending (outside of protected spending on state pensions and universal pensioner benefits). But finding the sought after £12 billion of cuts in just two years will not be easy. Cuts of this scale amount to almost 10% of unprotected benefits. Finding such a reduction without cutting child benefit, which has been pledged this week, would mean that even more significant cuts would likely be required to spending on one or more of tax credits, housing benefit and disability & incapacity benefits.”

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    June 05, 2015 by Laura Matthews Categories: Government And Reforms

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    Introduction The National Statement of Expectations for Supported Housing (NSE) was finally published on 20 October 2020, five years after the 2015 Comprehensive Spending Review suggested regulatory and oversight changes were needed, although in 2018 the government >>>

     

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    Responding to the DWP Consultation:  Housing Benefit Reform - Supported Housing

    "It was well-run, in a good location, and very useful.  I've only one suggestion; as the session went on it would perhaps have been useful for bullet points of general agreement about what should be in the sector response to be displayed and added to as the session went on, maybe on a flip chart. Regarding your response paper, I particularly like the answer you give to question 9.  In fact the general: "if it ain't broke don't fix it" response could be pushed harder."

    M.P. - Adref Ltd

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